World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Ovcha Kupel Stadium

Article Id: WHEBN0004033025
Reproduction Date:

Title: Ovcha Kupel Stadium  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Bulgarian A Football Group, Blagoje Marjanović, Bulgarian Cup, 2009–10 PFC Levski Sofia season, Sports venues in Sofia
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Ovcha Kupel Stadium

Slavia Stadium
Full name Slavia Stadium
Location Sofia, Bulgaria
Coordinates
Owner Municipality of Sofia
Operator Slavia Sofia
Capacity 15,992
Field size 105 X 68
Surface Grass
Construction
Built 1958
Tenants
Slavia Sofia (1932-present)
Bulgaria U21 (2009-present)

Slavia Stadium (Bulgarian: Стадион „Славия“) is a multi-purpose stadium in the Ovcha Kupel district of Sofia, Bulgaria. It is currently used for football matches and is the home ground of the local football club PFC Slavia Sofia. The stadium has a seating capacity of 15,992 spectators[1] and is one of the biggest sport facilities in Bulgaria.

  • The stadium is part of a multifunctional sport complex, which includes two football training grounds, one multi-purpose indoor hall and an ice-hockey arena with a capacity of 2,000 spectators.
  • Also, as of 2009, the Bulgaria national under-21 football team plays its home matches at this stadium.

In April 2014, a contract for building a new stadium to replace the old one was signed between PFC Slavia and the German company IFS. The capacity shall be expanded to 24,000, with an option for 33,000 spectators for major events. The deal was co-signed by the Bulgarian Football Union. The national teams shall be obliged to play their host matches at the new staduim. Also, the football union will bid with this stadium for a standard package of Euro 2020 matches.[2][3]

Old Slavia Stadium

The original home ground of Slavia was located just to the northwest of Ruski Pametnik near the center of Sofia. It was built in the mid-1920s and demolished in the late 1940s.[4]

References

  1. ^ [1] Accessed on August 21, 2009 (Bulgarian).
  2. ^ """Националният отбор се обвърза дългосрочно с бъдещия стадион в "Овча купел. dnevnik.bg (in Bulgarian). 10 April 2014. 
  3. ^ "Sofia Staduim". IFS. Retrieved 10 April 2014. 
  4. ^ Map of Sofia, 1946, "Sp. Club Slavia" can be seen in square V4 ('В4' in Cyrillic).


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.