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Parable of the Budding Fig Tree

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Title: Parable of the Budding Fig Tree  
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Parable of the Budding Fig Tree

The Parable of the Budding Fig Tree is a parable told by Jesus in the New Testament, found in Matthew 24:32-35, Mark 13:28-31, and Luke 21:29-33. This parable, about the Kingdom of God, involves a fig tree, as does the equally brief parable of the barren fig tree, with which it should not be confused.

Narrative

According to the Gospel of Luke:

Interpretations

Luke presents this parable as eschatological in nature:[1] like the leaves of the fig tree, the signs spoken of in the Olivet discourse of Luke 21:5-28 [2] indicate the coming of the Kingdom of God.

An alternate interpretation is that the fig tree represents the nation of Israel being politically reestablished in their land once again. Accordingly, when the modern state of Israel was formed on May 14, 1948, Hal Lindsey concluded that we are in the last generation.[3][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Bernard Brandon Scott, Hear Then the Parable: A commentary on the parables of Jesus, Fortress Press, 1989, ISBN 0-8006-2481-5, pp. 338-340.
  2. ^ Luke 21:5-28
  3. ^ Lindsey, Hal. The Late Great Planet Earth. Grand Rapids, MI. Zondervan, 1970.
  4. ^ Lindsey, Hal. 1977. Eternity, January 1977
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