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Paul Crête

Paul Crête
Member of the Canadian House of Commons
In office
1993–1997
Preceded by André Plourde
Succeeded by riding dissolved
Constituency Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup
In office
1997–2004
Preceded by first member
Succeeded by riding dissolved
Constituency Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques
In office
2004–2009
Preceded by first member
Succeeded by Bernard Généreux
Constituency Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup
Personal details
Born (1953-04-08) April 8, 1953
Hérouxville, Quebec
Political party Bloc Québécois
Spouse(s) Myriam Santerre
Residence Rivière-du-Loup, Quebec
Profession human resources director

Paul Crête (born April 8, 1953 in Hérouxville, Quebec) is a Canadian politician, who served as a Member of Parliament for the Bloc Québécois in the Canadian House of Commons from 1993 until 2009, when he announced that he was moving to provincial politics.

Contents

  • Political career 1
  • Critic 2
  • House of Commons Committees 3
    • Vice-Chair 3.1
    • Member 3.2
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Political career

Prior to his political career, he was a school administrator. Crête was first elected in 1993 representing Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup in the 1993 Canadian general election, then re-elected in 1997 representing Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup—Témiscouata—Les Basques defeating former Quebec MNA France Dionne in a hotly contested five way race.[1]

Crête was re-elected in the 2000 election and again in 2004 election for Rivière-du-Loup—Montmagny.

In May 2009, he resigned from the House of Commons to run for the Parti Québécois in the June 22 provincial by-election in Rivière-du-Loup. He lost to Liberal candidate Jean D'Amour.

Critic

  • Rural Solidarity ( - 1998)
  • Pension Reform ( - 1998)
  • Transport ( - 1998)
  • Human Resources Development (January 1, 1997 - June 26, 2002)
  • Children and Youth (2002 - June 26, 2002)
  • Industry (2002–2009)

House of Commons Committees

Vice-Chair

  • Standing Committee on Industry, Natural Resources, Science and Technology 38th Parliament, 1st Session

Member

  • Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities 36th Parliament, 1st Session
  • Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, 36th Parliament, 1st Session
  • Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, 36th Parliament, 2nd Session
  • Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, 36th Parliament, 2nd Session
  • Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, 37th Parliament, 1st Session
  • Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, 37th Parliament, 1st Session
  • Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Human Resources Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities, 37th Parliament, 1st Session
  • Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, 37th Parliament, 2nd Session
  • Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, 37th Parliament, 2nd Session
  • Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, 37th Parliament, 3rd Session
  • Subcommittee on Agenda and Procedure of the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, 37th Parliament, 3rd Session
  • Standing Committee on Industry, Natural Resources, Science and Technology, 38th Parliament, 1st Session

References

  1. ^ "Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup—Temiscouata—Les Basques election results". Parliament of Canada. June 2, 1997. 

External links

  • Paul Crête – Parliament of Canada biography
  • How'd They Vote?: Paul Crête's voting history and quotes
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