World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Penknife

Article Id: WHEBN0000974099
Reproduction Date:

Title: Penknife  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Robert-François Damiens, Ballpoint pen knife, Jonathan Luna, Garrat Noel, Paper cutter
Collection: Domestic Implements, Pocket Knives
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Penknife

A simple penknife.

A penknife, or pen knife, is a British English term for a small folding knife.[1] It was originally used to describe a knife used for cutting or sharpening a quill to make a dip pen nib.[1] Originally, penknives were used for thinning and pointing quills to prepare them for use as writing instruments and, later, for repairing or re-pointing the quills. They did not necessarily have folding blades, but resembled a scalpel or wood knife by having a short, fixed blade at the end of a long handle.

Today the word penknife is the common British English term for both a pocketknife, which can have single or multiple blades, and for multi-tools, with additional tools incorporated into the design.[2]

Over the last hundred years there has been a proliferation of multi-function knives with multifarious blades and gadgets, including; awls, reamers, scissors, nail files, corkscrews, tweezers, toothpicks, and so on. The tradition continues with the incorporation of modern devices such as ballpoint pens, LED torches, and USB flash drives.[3]

The most famous example of a multi-function penknife is the Swiss Army knife, some versions of which number dozens of functions and are really more of a folding multi-tool, incorporating a blade or two, than a penknife with extras.[3]

A larger folding knife, especially one in which the blade locks into place, is often called a claspknife.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b  
  2. ^ Moore, Simon (1988). Penknives and Other Folding Knives. Osprey Publishing. pp. 25–26.  
  3. ^ a b c Shackleford, Steve (5 January 2010). Blade's Guide to Knives & Their Values. Iola, Wisconsin: Krause Publications. pp. 219–222.  

External links

  • http://www.victorinox.ch/index.cfm?page=0&lang=E
  • http://www.wengerna.com/index.html
  • http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pen%20knife
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.