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Pentapolis

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Title: Pentapolis  
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Subject: Philistines, Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, Patrimonium Sancti Petri, Zoara, Ekron
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Pentapolis

A pentapolis, from the Greek words πέντε (pente), "five" and πόλις (polis), "city(-state)" is a geographic and/or institutional grouping of five cities. Cities in the ancient world probably formed such groups for political, commercial and military reasons, as happened later with the Cinque Ports in England.

Contents

  • Significant historical cases 1
  • Pentapoleis of the modern world 2
    • Italy 2.1
    • India 2.2
    • United States of America 2.3
    • Algeria 2.4
  • Notes 3
  • See also 4
  • Sources and references 5

Significant historical cases

The Pentapolis on the Adriatic was part of the Exarchate of Ravenna, an administrative unit of the Byzantine Empire. Red: The Pentapolis. Orange: Other cities of the Exarchate.

Pentapoleis of the modern world

Italy

India

United States of America

Algeria

  • There are five qsur "walled villages" (ksour) located on rocky outcrops along the Wəd Mzab collectively known as the Pentapolis. They are Ghardaïa Tagherdayt, the principal settlement today; Beni Isguen At Isjen; Melika At Mlishet; Bounoura At Bunur; and El Atteuf Tajnint. Adding the more recent settlements of Bérianne and El Guerrara, the Mzab Heptapolis is completed.[3]

Notes

  1. ^  "Pentapolis".  
  2. ^ Barron, James. "IF YOU'RE THINKING OF LIVING IN: FIVE TOWNS", The New York Times, July 10, 1983. Accessed May 20, 2008. "The basic five are Lawrence, Cedarhurst, Woodmere, Hewlett and Inwood. But the area also includes some unincorporated communities and two tiny villages, Hewlett Bay Park and Woodsburgh, that are not added to the final total."
  3. ^ http://www.worldheritagesite.orgs/mzabvalley.html

See also

Sources and references

  • many occurrences in the Catholic Encyclopaedia
  • Westermann Großer Atlas zur Weltgeschichte ('Great Atlas of World History', in German)
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