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Phacochoerus

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Title: Phacochoerus  
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Subject: Desert warthog, Giant forest hog, Phacochoerus, Pigs, List of mammal genera
Collection: Mammal Genera, Phacochoerus, Pigs
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Phacochoerus

Phacochoerus
Common warthog, Phacochoerus africanus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Suidae
Subfamily: Phacochoerinae
Genus: Phacochoerus
F. Cuvier, 1826
Species

Phacochoerus aethiopicus
Phacochoerus africanus

Phacochoerus is a genus of wild pigs in the Suidae family, known as warthogs. It is the sole genus of subfamily Phacochoerinae. They are found in open and semiopen habitats, even in quite arid regions, in sub-Saharan Africa. The two species were formerly considered conspecific under the scientific name Phacochoerus aethiopicus, but today this is limited to the desert warthog, while the best-known and most widespread species, the common warthog (or simply warthog) is Phacochoerus africanus.[1]

Phacochoerus africanus

Although covered in bristly hairs, their bodies and heads appear largely naked from a distance, with only the crest along the back, and the tufts on their cheeks and tails being obviously haired. The English name refers to their facial wattles, which are particularly distinct in males. They also have very distinct tusks, which reach a length of 25.5 to 63.5 cm (10.0 to 25.0 in) in the males, but are always smaller in the females.[2] They are largely herbivorous, but occasionally also eat small animal food.[3] While both species remain fairly common and widespread, and therefore are considered to be of Least Concern by the IUCN, the nominate subspecies of the desert warthog, commonly known as the Cape warthog, became extinct around 1865.[4]

References

  1. ^ Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M., eds. (2005). Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press.  
  2. ^ Novak, R. M. (editor) (1999). Walker's Mammals of the World. Vol. 2. 6th edition. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore. ISBN 0-8018-5789-9
  3. ^ Kingdon, J. (1997). The Kingdon Guide to African Mammals. Academic Press Limited, London. ISBN 0-12-408355-2
  4. ^ d'Huart, J.P., Butynski, T.M.M. & De Jong, Y. (2008). "Phacochoerus aethiopicus".  

External links

  • d'Huart, J.P. & Grubb, P. (2005). A photographic guide to the differences between the Common Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) and the Desert Warthog (Ph. aethiopicus). Suiform Soundings 5(2): 4-8.


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