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Phase One (company)

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Phase One (company)

Phase One A/S.
Subsidiary
Industry Digital Imaging
Founded Denmark (1993)
Headquarters Copenhagen, Denmark
Key people
Samir Léhaff, Founder
Henrik O. Håkonsson, CEO
Products Cameras, Digital backs, Lenses, RAW Processing Software, Photo management software, Camera control software
Revenue Increase DKK 294 million (2012)[1]
Increase DKK 126 million (2012)[1]
Increase DKK 30 million (2012)[1]
Number of employees
300
Parent Silverfleet Capital
Subsidiaries Phase One U.S Inc.
Phase One Germany
Phase One China
Phase One Japan
Leaf Imaging
Mamiya Digital Imaging (partial ownership)
Website phaseone.com
help.phaseone.com
industrial.phaseone.com
blog.phaseone.com
mamiyaleaf.com
Phase One on Facebook
Phase One on Twitter
Phase One on Google+
Phase One on YouTube
Footnotes / references
Company is partially an employee owned organization.

Phase One is a Danish company specializing in high-end digital photography equipment and software. It manufactures open platform based medium format camera systems and solutions. Their own RAW processing software, Capture One, supports many DSLRs besides their backs.

PODAS workshops (Phase One Digital Artist Series) is a series of worldwide photography workshops designed for digital photographers interested in working with medium format, high-resolution cameras. PODAS is a part of the Phase One educational division. Each attendee receives a Phase One digital camera system for the duration of the workshop.[2]

On 18 February 2014 it was announced that UK-based private equity firm Silverfleet Capital would acquire a 60% majority stake in the company.[3]

Products

Cameras

In 2009, Phase One purchased a major stake in Japanese Mamiya and the two companies develop products together.

  • Phase One 645DF+
  • Phase One 645DF (discontinued)
  • Phase One 645AF (discontinued)
  • Phase One iXA (aerial)
  • Phase One iXR (reproduction)
  • Phase One iXU (aerial, surveillance and UAV operations)

The Phase One 645DF+ and 645DF cameras are medium format cameras which support both focal plane and leaf shutter lenses with shutter speeds ranging from 1/4000s to 60 minutes and flash synchronization up to 1/1600 sec.[4][5] Among the new features on the 645DF+ are:[4]

  • Fast and accurate auto focus especially in low contrast environments
  • Custom focus fine-tuning adjustment
  • Rechargeable Li-ion battery with up to 10,000 captures on one charge
  • Rugged construction for high volume production use

The Phase One V-Grip Air vertical grip is compatible with the 645DF+/645DF. The V-Grip Air supports a Profoto Air flash trigger for wireless flash synchronization.[6]

The 645DF+/645DF supports digital back interfaces including the IQ and P+ series digital backs as well as 3rd party digital backs from Hasselblad, Leaf and others.

In 2012, Phase One released two specialty cameras: iXR[7] which is made specifically for reproduction and iXA[8] which is made specifically for aerial photography. Both uses the 645 lenses as the normal 645 cameras. Main difference on this camera is they have no viewfinder and very few mechanical moving parts.

In 2013, Phase One signed a collaborative distribution agreement with Digital Transitions (DT) to deliver advanced digitization solutions for cultural heritage preservation imaging projects worldwide (Repro camera solutions). The range of Digital Transitions digitization equipment includes a multitude of reprographic benches, purpose-built reprographic cameras, specialized book copy stations, film scanning kits, and accessories that are designed to host the line of Phase One digital capture hardware and Capture One software.

In 2014, Phase One launched a medium format digital back with a CMOS/Active pixel sensor: The IQ250. All Phase One digital backs launched prior to the IQ250 have sensors based on the CCD (Charge-coupled device) technology.

Lenses

The 645DF+ is compatible with the following lenses:

  • Phase One Digital focal plane lenses
  • Schneider Kreuznach leaf shutter lenses
  • Mamiya 645 AF lenses
  • Mamiya 645 manual lenses
  • Compatible with Hasselblad V and Pentacon 6 (via multimount adaptor)[9]

Phase One branded, produced by Mamiya

  • AF 28mm f/4.5 Aspherical
  • AF 35mm f/3.5
  • AF 45mm f/2.8
  • AF 80mm f/2.8
  • MF 120mm f/4 Macro
  • AF 120mm f/4 Macro
  • AF 150mm f/2.8
  • AF 75-150mm f/4.5

Phase One branded, produced by Hartblei

  • MF 45mm f/3.5 T/S (Discontinued)

Schneider Kreuznach

Schneider Kreuznach 80mm f/2.8
Schneider Kreuznach 80mm f/2.8 rear
  • LS 28mm f/4.5 Aspherical
  • LS 40-80mm f/4-5.6
  • LS 55mm f/2.8
  • LS 80mm f/2.8
  • LS 110mm f/2.8
  • MF 120mm f/5.6 T/S
  • LS 150mm f/3.5
  • LS 240mm f/4.5 IF
  • LS 75-150mm f/4.0-5.6

Digital backs

IQ2 Series

Model Sensor Size Sensor Type Resolution (Sensor+ Mode) Active Pixels ISO range (Sensor+ Mode) Dynamic range Frames per Second (Sensor+ Mode) Lens conversion factor Display Storage Host Connection Released
IQ280 53.7 x 40.4 mm CCD 80 MP (20 MP), 16 bit 10328 x 7760 35–800 (140 - 3200) 13 f-stops 0.7 / (0.9) 1.0 3.2-inch 1.5-megapixel Retina-type multi touchscreen CF up to UDMA 6 IEE1394b Firewire800, USB3 / USB2 and WiFi 2013
IQ260 53.9 x 40.4 mm CCD 60.5 MP (15 MP), 16 bit 8984 x 6732 50–800 (200 - 3200) 13 f-stops 1.0 / (1.4) 1.0 2013
IQ260 Achromatic 53.9 x 40.4 mm CCD 60.5 MP (N/A), 16 bit 8984 x 6732 50–800 (200 - 3200) 13 f-stops 1.0 / (1.4) 1.0 2013
IQ250 44.0 x 33.0 mm CMOS 50.0 MP (N/A), 16 bit 8280 x 6208 100 - 6400 14 f-stops 1.2 1.3 2014

IQ1 Series

An 80 MP photo taken with an IQ180 digital back (color-profile not handled correctly by some browsers).

The IQ series Phase One backs include many industry-first innovations. It is the first camera to utilize a USB 3 connection. At the time of the release, this is not very widespread but USB 3 is backward compatible with USB 2. Also, it is the first camera to include a high resolution multi-touch display, which is similar to the "Retina" screen used in the iPhone 4.[10]

Model Sensor Size Sensor Type Resolution (Sensor+ Mode) Active Pixels ISO range (Sensor+ Mode) Dynamic range Frames per Second (Sensor+ Mode) Lens conversion factor Display Storage Host Connection Released
IQ180 53.7 x 40.4 mm CCD 80 MP (20 MP), 16 bit 10328 x 7760 35–800 (140 - 3200) 12.5 f-stops 0.7 / (0.9) 1.0 3.2-inch 1.5-megapixel Retina-type multi touchscreen CF up to UDMA 6 IEE1394b Firewire800 and USB3 / USB2 2011
IQ160 53.9 x 40.4 mm CCD 60.5 MP (15 MP), 16 bit 8984 x 6732 50–800 (200 - 3200) 12.5 f-stops 1.0 / (1.4) 1.0 2011
IQ150 44.0 x 33.0 mm CMOS 50.0 MP (N/A), 16 bit 8280 x 6208 100 - 6400 14 f-stops 1.2 1.3 2014
IQ140 43.9 x 32.9 mm, CCD 40 MP (10 MP), 16 bit 7320 x 5484 50–800 (200 - 3200) 12 f-stops 1.2 / (1.8) 1.25 2011

P+ Series

The P+ series are similar to the normal P series but have higher capture speeds, better response to long exposure times, and add Live Preview, which allows the user to focus and compose on a monitor while tethered.

Also, a new high resolution LCD screen was implemented with better resolution and luminance.
Model Sensor Size Resolution (Sensor+ Mode) Active Pixels ISO range (Sensor+ Mode) Dynamic range Frames per Second (Sensor+ Mode) Lens conversion factor Display Storage Host Connection Released
P65+ 53.9 x 40.4mm 60.5 MP (15 MP), 16 bit 8984 x 6732 50–800 (200-3200) 12.5 f-stops 1.0 / (1.4) 1.0 2.2-inch 230,000 px TFT CF IEE1394 Firewire 2008
P45+ 49.1 x 36.8mm, 39 MP, 16 bit 7216 x 5412 50–800 12 f-stops 0.67 1.15 2007
P40+ 43.9 x 32.9mm, 40 MP (10 MP), 16 bit 7320 x 5484 50–800 (200 - 3200) 12 f-stops 1.2 / (1.8) 1.25 2009
P30+ 44.2 x 33.1mm, 31.6 MP, 16 bit 6496 x 4872 100–1600 12 f-stops 0.8 1.25 2007
P25+ 48.9 x 36.7mm, 22 MP, 16 bit 5436 x 4080 50–800 12 f-stops 0.67 1.15 2007
P21+ 44.2 x 33.1mm, 18 MP, 16 bit 4904 x 3678 100–800 12 f-stops 1.25 1.25 2007
P20+ 36.9 x 36.9mm, 16 MP, 16 bit 4080 x 4080 50–800 12 f-stops 0.87 1.5 2007

P Series

The P-series are fully untethered backs available for many different camera mounts.
Model Sensor Size Resolution Active Pixels ISO range Dynamic range Frames per Second Lens conversion factor Display Storage Host Connection Released
P45 49.1 x 36.8mm, 39 MP, 16 bit 7216 x 5412 50–400 12 f-stops 0,58 1.15 2.2-inch 116,000 px TFT CF IEE1394 Firewire 2005
P30 44.2 x 33.1mm, 31,6 MP, 16 bit 6496 x 4872 100–800 12 f-stops 0,67 1.25 2005
P25 48.9 x 36.7mm, 22 MP, 16 bit 5436 x 4080 50–800 12 f-stops 0,58 1.15 2004
P21 44.2 x 33.1mm, 18 MP, 16 bit 4904 x 3678 100–800 12 f-stops 1,0 1.25 2005
P20 36.9 x 36.9mm, 16 MP, 16 bit 4080 x 4080 50–800 12 f-stops 0,7 1.5 2004

H Series

The H-series are tethered backs available for many different camera mounts. Camera back connects through standard 6pin IEEE 1394. Originally this type of camera back was released as the "Lightphase", a continuation of Phase One's previous tradition of using the name "phase" in the name of the product.

This changed with the release of the "H20", which was originally called "Lightphase H20" but the name was changed to "Phase One H20" for better brand recognition.
Model Sensor Size Resolution Active Pixels ISO range Dynamic range Frames per Second Lens conversion factor Display Storage Host Connection Released
H25 48.9 x 36.7mm, 22 MP, 16 bit 5436 x 4080 50–400 12 f-stops 0,5 1.15 N/A N/A IEE1394 Firewire 2003
H20 36.9 x 36.9mm, 16 MP, 16 bit 4080 x 4080 50–100 12 f-stops 0,33 1.5 2001
H101 / H10 36.9 x 24.6mm, 11 MP, 16 bit 3992 x 2656 50–400 1.65 2002
H5/H10 36 x 24mm 6 MP, 16 bit 3056 x 2032 50–100 1.65 2002
Lightphase 36 x 24mm 6 MP, 16 bit 3056 x 2032 50–100 1.65 1998

Scan Backs

The Scan backs are tethered digital scan backs. All use SCSI connection except for PowerPhase FX, which uses IEEE1394 "firewire". The very early models, which were known as the CB6x (StudioKit) and FC70 (PhotoPhase), were made in plastic and had external control unit that connected to a computer through NuBus.

Model Sensor Size Resolution ISO range Host Connection Released
PowerPhase FX/FX+ 12,600 steps x 10,500 pixels 132 MP, 14 bit 100–1600 IEE1394 Firewire 2000
PowerPhase 7,000 steps x 7,000 pixels 36 MP, 12 bit N/A SCSI 1997
PhotoPhase 7,200 steps x 5,000 pixels 36 MP, 10 bit N/A 1996
StudioKit 3,600 steps x 2,500 pixels 9 MP, 10 bit N/A 1996

Repro camera solutions

Phase One reprographic camera systems and book capture / scanners are purpose-built to provide preservation-level rapid capture of rare books, circulation materials, manuscripts, documents, photographic slides, photographic negatives and photographic glass-plates.

Phase One repro camera solutions include the following products:

  • Phase One IXR Camera
  • DT RCam Reprographic Camera
  • DT RG3040 Reprographic System
  • DT RGC180 Capture Cradle
  • BC100 Book Capture System
  • DT Film Scanning Kit

Imaging software

  • Capture One v8
    • Capture One 8 PRO
    • Capture One 8 PRO (For Sony)
    • Capture One 8 DB
    • Capture One 8 Express (For Sony)
  • Capture One v7
    • Capture One 7 PRO
    • Capture One 7 DB
    • Capture One 7 Express
  • Capture One v6 (Discontinued)
    • Capture One 6 PRO
    • Capture One 6 DB
    • Capture One 6 Express
  • Capture Pilot (available on the Apple App Store)
  • Media Pro 1 (formerly known as Microsoft Expression Media and iView MediaPro)
  • Capture One v5 (Discontinued)
    • Capture One 5 PRO
    • Capture One 5 DB
    • Capture One 5
  • Capture One v4 (Discontinued)
    • Capture One 4 PRO
    • Capture One 4 DB
    • Capture One 4
  • Capture One v3.x (Discontinued)
    • Capture One PRO
    • Capture One DB
    • Capture One SE (Discontinued 2004)
    • Capture One LE
    • Capture One REBEL (Discontinued 2004)
  • Portrait One (Discontinued)
    • Portrait One Executive
    • Portrait One Lite
    • Portrait One Sales

Product release in reverse chronological order

  • IQ350, IQ360, IQ380 - 2015
  • IQ150 - 2014
  • Phase One iXU - 2014
  • IQ250 - 2014
  • IQ280, IQ260, IQ260 Achomatic - 2013
  • Phase One 645DF+ - 2012
  • Phase One iXR, Phase One iXA - 2012
  • IQ180, IQ160, IQ140 - 2011
  • P40+ - 2009
  • Phase One 645DF - 2009
  • P65+ - 2008
  • Phase One 645AF - 2008
  • P20+, P21+, P25+, P30+, and P45+ - 2007
  • P21, P30, and P45 - 2005
  • P20 and P25 - 2004
  • H25 - 2003
  • H101 (H10 11 MP, Hasselblad H1 design) - 2002
  • H10 (11 MP) - 2002
  • H5 and H10 6 MP (Re-branded Lightphase) - 2002
  • PowerPhase FX+ - 2002
  • H20 - 2001
  • PowerPhase FX - 2000
  • LightPhase (645 versions and BB03) - 1999
  • LightPhase (BB02) - 1999
  • LightPhase (BB01) - 1998/1999
  • LightPhase (BB00) - 1998
  • PowerPhase - 1997
  • StudioKit - 1996
  • PhotoPhase (+) - 1995/1996
  • CB6x and FC70 - 1993

References

  1. ^ a b c
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^
Reviews
  • photoartsmonthly.com: On location with the Phase One IQ180
  • shutterbug.com: Phase One 645DF With Touchscreen IQ160 Back: An Integrated Medium Format System
  • rangefinderonline.com: First exposure: Phase One IQ180 Digital Back
  • pdnonline.com: 2011 Photo Gear of the Year
  • news.cnet.com: Phase One IQ180: 80 megapixels of lavish color
  • dxomark.com: Phase One IQ 180: the new king of all sensors
  • luminous-landscape.com: More Than Megapixels - Phase One IQ180 in The Field
  • wired.com: What Would You Do With 80 Million Pixels? (IQ180)
Phase One material
  • List of serial number prefix to identify model of camera back
  • Official Press release announcing Phase One becoming major shareholder in Mamiya Digital Imaging
  • Official Press release announcing Phase One starting the new subsidiary "Leaf Imaging"
  • Official Press release announcing Phase One cooperation with Schneider Kreuznach to develop lenses

External links

  • Official website
  • Mamiya Leaf web site
  • Official Press release announcing Phase One cooperation with Schneider Kreuznach to develop lenses
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