World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Project management software

Article Id: WHEBN0000206011
Reproduction Date:

Title: Project management software  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Business software, TargetProcess, In-Step BLUE, GanttProject, NetPoint
Collection: Project Management Software
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Project management software

Project management software has the capacity to help plan, organize, and manage resource pools and develop resource estimates. Depending on the sophistication of the software, it can manage estimation and planning, scheduling, cost control and budget management, resource allocation, collaboration software, communication, decision-making, quality management and documentation or administration systems.[1] Today, numerous PC & browser based project management software exist and they are finding their way into almost every type of business.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Tasks and activities 2
    • Scheduling 2.1
    • Providing information 2.2
  • Types 3
    • Desktop 3.1
    • Web-based 3.2
    • Personal 3.3
    • Single user 3.4
    • Collaborative 3.5
    • Integrated 3.6
    • Non-specialized tools 3.7
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Further reading 6
  • Contribution 7
  • External links 8

History

In the early days, project management software ran on big mainframe computers and was used only in large projects. These early systems were limited in their capabilities and, by today's standards, were difficult to use.

Tasks and activities

Scheduling

One of the most common project management software tool types is scheduling tools. Scheduling tools are used to sequence project activities and assign dates and resources to them. The detail and sophistication of a schedule produced by a scheduling tool can vary considerably with the project management methodology used, the features provided and the scheduling methods supported. Scheduling tools may include support for:[2]

Providing information

Project planning software can be expected to provide information to various people or stakeholders, and can be used to measure and justify the level of effort required to complete the project(s). Typical requirements might include:

  • Overview information on how long tasks will take to complete.
  • Early warning of any risks to the project.
  • Information on workload, for planning holidays.
  • Evidence.
  • Historical information on how projects have progressed, and in particular, how actual and planned performance are related.
  • Optimum utilization of available resource.
  • Cost maintenance.
  • Collaboration with each teammates and customers.
  • Instant communication to collaborators and customers.

Types

Desktop

Project management software has been implemented as a program that runs on the desktop of each user. Project management tools that are implemented as desktop software are typically single-user applications used by the project manager or another subject matter expert, such as a scheduler or risk manager.

Web-based

Project management software has been implemented as a web application to be accessed using a web browser. This may also include the ability to use a smartphone or tablet to gain access to the application. Software as a Service (SaaS) is also web-based and has become a common delivery model for many business applications, including Project Management, Project Management Information System (PMIS) and Project Portfolio Management (PPM). SaaS is typically accessed by users using a thin client via a web browser.

Personal

A personal project management application is one used at home, typically to manage lifestyle or home projects. There is considerable overlap with single user systems, although personal project management software typically involves simpler interfaces. See also non-specialised tools below.

Single user

A single-user system is programmed with the assumption that only one person will ever need to edit the project plan at once. This may be used in small companies, or ones where only a few people are involved in top-down project planning. Desktop applications generally fall into this category.

Collaborative

A collaborative system is designed to support multiple users modifying different sections of the plan at once; for example, updating the areas they personally are responsible for such that those estimates get integrated into the overall plan. Web-based tools, including extranets, generally fall into this category, but have the limitation that they can only be used when the user has live Internet access. To address this limitation, some software tools using client–server architecture provide a rich client that runs on users' desktop computer and replicate project and task information to other project team members through a central server when users connect periodically to the network. Some tools allow team members to check out their schedules (and others' as read only) to work on them while not on the network. When reconnecting to the database, all changes are synchronized with the other schedules.

Integrated

An integrated system combines project management or project planning, with many other aspects of company life. For example, projects can have bug tracking issues assigned to each project, the list of project customers becomes a customer relationship management module, and each person on the project plan has their own task lists, calendars, and messaging functionality associated with their projects.

Similarly, specialised tools like source control (CVS) software and bug-tracking software, so that each piece of information can be integrated into the same system.

Non-specialized tools

While specialized software is common, software that is not project management-specific is often used in the management of projects. In particular, office productivity tools are used by most project managers.

See also

References

  1. ^ Janssen, Cory. "Project Management Software". Techopedia. Retrieved 22 May 2013. 
  2. ^ Nevogt, Dave (17 September 2013). "31 Project Management Solutions". Hubstaff. Retrieved 3 November 2013. 

Further reading

  • Eric Uyttewaal: Dynamic Scheduling With Microsoft(r) Project 2000: The Book By and For Professionals, ISBN 0-9708276-0-1
  • George Suhanic: Computer-Aided Project Management, ISBN 0-19-511591-0
  • Richard E. Westney: Computerized Management of Multiple Small Projects, ISBN 0-8247-8645-9
  • Gido, J. (1999). Appendix A: Project Management for Software [Afterword]. In Successful Project Management (p. 334). Cincinnati, OH: South-Western College Pub.
  • Project Time Management. (2008). In A guide to the project management body of knowledge (PMBOK guide) (4th ed., p. 145). Newtown Square, Pa: Project Management Institute.

Contribution

  • Project Engineer - Engineering Community For Projects

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.