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Propositional variable

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Title: Propositional variable  
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Subject: Propositional calculus, Outline of logic, Valuation (logic), Atomic formula, BL (logic)
Collection: Concepts in Logic, Logic Symbols, Propositional Calculus
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Propositional variable

In mathematical logic, a propositional variable (also called a sentential variable or sentential letter) is a variable which can either be true or false. Propositional variables are the basic building-blocks of propositional formulas, used in propositional logic and higher logics.

Contents

  • Uses 1
  • In first order logic 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Uses

Formulas in logic are typically built up recursively from some propositional variables, some number of logical connectives, and some logical quantifiers. Propositional variables are the atomic formulas of propositional logic.

Example

In a given propositional logic, we might define a formula as follows:

  • Every propositional variable is a formula.
  • Given a formula X the negation ¬X is a formula.
  • Given two formulas X and Y, and a binary connective b (such as the logical conjunction ∧), then (X b Y) is a formula. (Note the parentheses.)

In this way, all of the formulas of propositional logic are built up from propositional variables as a basic unit. Propositional variables should not be confused with the metavariables which appear in the typical axioms of propositional calculus; the latter effectively range over well-formed formulae.

In first order logic

Propositional variables are represented as nullary predicates in first order logic.

See also

References

  • Smullyan, Raymond M. First-Order Logic. 1968. Dover edition, 1995. Chapter 1.1: Formulas of Propositional Logic.
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