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Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park

 

Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park

Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park
IUCN category V (protected landscape/seascape)
thatched structure with carvings at sea shore
Reconstructed Hale o Keawe
Map showing the location of Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park
Map showing the location of Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park
Location Hawaii County, Hawaii, USA
Nearest city Holualoa, Hawaiʻi
Coordinates
Area 420 acres (1.7 km2)
Established July 26, 1955
Visitors 442,353 (in 2012)[1]
Governing body National Park Service
http://www.nps.gov/puho/
The entrance to the park

Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park located on the west coast of the island of Hawaiʻi in the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi. The historical park preserves the site where, up until the early 19th century, Hawaiians who broke a kapu (one of the ancient laws) could avoid certain death by fleeing to this place of refuge or puʻuhonua. The offender would be absolved by a priest and freed to leave. Defeated warriors and non-combatants could also find refuge here during times of battle. The grounds just outside the Great Wall that encloses the puʻuhonua were home to several generations of powerful chiefs.

Contents

  • The park 1
  • Hale O Keawe heiau 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

The park

The 420 acre (1.7 km2) site was originally established in 1955 as City of Refuge National Historical Park and was renamed on November 10, 1978. In 2000 the name was changed by the Hawaiian National Park Language Correction Act of 2000 observing the Hawaiian spelling.[2] It includes the puʻuhonua and a complex of archeological sites including: temple platforms, royal fishponds, sledding tracks, and some coastal village sites. The Hale o Keawe temple and several thatched structures have been reconstructed.

Hawaiian Hale at the Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park

Hale O Keawe heiau

The park contains a reconstruction of the Hale O Keawe heiau, which was originally built by a Kona chief named Kanuha in honor of his father King Keaweʻīkekahialiʻiokamoku. After the death of Keaweʻīkekahialiʻiokamoku, his bones were entombed within the heiau. The nobility (ali'i) of Kona continued to be buried until the abolition of the kapu system. The last person buried here was a son of Kamehameha I in 1818.

It was believed that additional protection to the place of refuge was received from the

  • Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park - National Park Service official site
  • U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park
  • Photo essay on residences of Hawaiian Kings
  • Go Hawaii article about the park with photos
  • Photographs of the reflecting pools at Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park *Broken Link*
External video
Fly-through of Pu'uhonua o Honaunau NHP, Honaunau, HI, HALS, March 18, 2014

External links

  • Ward, Greg. 2004, The Rough Guide to Hawaii. Rough Guides.
  1. ^
  2. ^ Hawaiian National Park Language Correction Act of 2000 (S.939)
  3. ^
  4. ^

References

See also

The park was used as a background in Where in the U.S.A. is Carmen Sandiego? when the player goes to Hawaii.

Protectors of the Gods at the Place of Refuge

[4] in 1858.Royal Mausoleum of Hawaii. She then ordered this last temple to be destroyed. The bones were later moved to the Kealakekua Bay cliffs above nearby Pali Kapu O Keōua removed the remaining bones and hid them in the High Chiefess Kapiʻolani In 1829, [3]

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