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Rajgarh district

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Title: Rajgarh district  
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Rajgarh district

Rajgarh district
राजगढ़ जिला
District of Madhya Pradesh
Location of Rajgarh district in Madhya Pradesh
Location of Rajgarh district in Madhya Pradesh
Country India
State Madhya Pradesh
Administrative division Bhopal
Headquarters Rajgarh (Madhya Pradesh)
Government
 • Lok Sabha constituencies Rajgarh
Area
 • Total 6,154 km2 (2,376 sq mi)
Population (2011)
 • Total 1,545,814
 • Density 250/km2 (650/sq mi)
Demographics
 • Literacy 61.21 %
Major highways NH-3, NH-12
Website Official website

Rajgarh District is a District of Madhya Pradesh state in central India. The city of Rajgarh is the administrative headquarters of the district.

The district has an area of 6,154 km² and the population is 1,545,814 (2011 census).[1] The district lies on the northern edge of the Malwa plateau, and the Parbati River forms the eastern boundary of the district, while the Kali Sindh River forms the western boundary. The district has seven tehsils, Rajgarh, Khilchipur, Zirapur, Biaora, Narsinghgarh, Sarangpur and pachore . The district is bounded by Rajasthan state to the north, and by the districts of Guna to the northeast, Bhopal to the east, Sehore to the southeast, and Shajapur to the south and west. It is part of Bhopal Division.

The district was created May 1948, and includes the territory of the former princely states of Rajgarh, Narsinghgarh, Khilchipur, and parts of the states of Dewas Junior and Senior (Sarangpur tehsil) and Indore (Jirapur tehsil, now part of Khilchipur tehsil).

In addition to the town of Rajgarh, Khilchipur, Kotravihar and Narsinghgarh are places of interest.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Economy 2
  • Demographics 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

The District takes its name from the headquarters town Rajgarh. Rajgarh District was constituted after the formation of Madhya Bharat in May, 1948. Prior to this the area of the present District was parceled out among the States of Rajgarh, Narsinghgarh, Khilchipur, Dewas (Senior) Dewas (Junior) and Indore. Rajgarh was the headquarters of a mediatised State, ruled by the Umat Rajputs and branch of the great paramara clan, they enjoyed a Sanad Estate under the Sultans of Delhi and Mughal emperors in succession. The first capital was Duparia, now in Shajapur District. Later on it was shifted to Dungarpur (19 km from Rajgarh) and then to Ratanpur (19 km. west of Narsinghgarh) and back. Inorder to avoid disturbance by the frequently passing Mughal armies, the Ruler of the Estate, Mohan Singh, acquired the present side, originally known as Jhanjhanipur from the Bhils in A.D. 1640. Finally he shifted the headquarters in the year 1645, giving the place its present name.

During the reign of Akbar (A.D. 1556-1605) a Khilat and a Sanad were granted to Udaji of Tatanpur. At that time, Sarangpur was a Sarkar in the Subah of Malwa. Its jurisdiction extended from the western part of present Sehore District to the eastern part of Ujjain District. Among its twentyfour mahals many have retained their original names and are identified as Ashtah, Talain (Talen), Agra (Agar), Bajilpur (Bijilpur), Bhorsah, Khiljipur, Jirapur, Sarangpur, Sondarsi (Sundarsi), Sosner (Sunner) Sajapur, Kayath and Navgam (Tarana)1. In 1908, Rajgarh State was divided in to seven Parganas, namely Newalganj, Biaora, Kalipith, Karanwas, Kotra, Seogarh and Talen. Narsinghgarh State was divided into four Parganas, namely Huzur (Narsinghgarh), Pachor, Khujner and Chhapera. The Parganas were place in the charge of a Tahsildar each for revenue matters and magisterial work.2 Khilchipur State was divided into three Paraganas. Sarangpur was as now, the tahsil headquarters of Dewas (Senior) and Dewas (Junior) States. Jarapur was a tahsil of Mahidpur District of former Indore State. It has now been abolished and merged in Khilchipur tahsil.

In 1645 with the permission of Rajmata, Deewan Ajab Singh defeated the Bhils in the hilly region of Rajgarh and he constructed a Palace in 1745 which was having five main gates namely, Itwaria, Bhudwaria, Surajpol, Panradia and Naya Darwaja. And it constitutes three very ancient temple namely Raj Rajeshwar Temple, Chatubhujnathji Temple and Narsingh Temple, and in which Rajmata and his 15-year-old son Rawat Mohan singh was living safely. In Jhanjherpur which was capital and it is having a palace due to which this place is known as Rajgarh and it had become famous.

Economy

In 2006 the Ministry of Panchayati Raj named Rajgarh one of the country's 250 most backward districts (out of a total of 640).[2] It is one of the 24 districts in Madhya Pradesh currently receiving funds from the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme (BRGF).[2]

Demographics

According to the 2011 census Rajgarh District has a population of 1,545,814,[1] which is more than that of nations like Swaziland or Mauritius[3] This gives it a ranking of 322nd in India (out of a total of 640).[4] The district has a population density of 251 inhabitants per square kilometre (650/sq mi) .[1] Its population growth rate over the decade 2001-2011 was 23.26%.[1] Rajgarh has a sex ratio of 956 females for every 1000 males and a literacy rate of 61.21%.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e http://www.census2011.co.in/census/district/309-rajgarh.html
  2. ^ a b Ministry of Panchayati Raj (September 8, 2009). "A Note on the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme" (PDF). National Institute of Rural Development. Retrieved September 27, 2011. 
  3. ^ https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2119rank.html
  4. ^ http://www.census2011.co.in/district.php

External links

  • Rajgarh District web site

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