World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Ralph Rainger

Ralph Rainger
Birth name Ralph Reichenthal
Born (1901-10-07)October 7, 1901
Origin New York City, U.S.
Died October 23, 1942(1942-10-23) (aged 41)
near Palm Springs, California, U.S.
Occupation(s) Composer
Instruments Piano
Years active 1928–1942[1]

Ralph Rainger (October 7, 1901 – October 23, 1942) was an American composer of popular music principally for films.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Film credits 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Biography

Born Ralph Reichenthal in New York City, Rainger embarked on a legal career before escaping to Broadway where he became Clifton Webb's accompanist.[1]

His first hit "Moanin' Low," with lyrics by Howard Dietz, was written for Webb's co-star Libby Holman in the 1929 revue The Little Show. Moving to Hollywood, Rainger teamed up with lyricist Leo Robin to produce a string of successful film songs.[1]

In the years that followed, Rainger wrote or collaborated on such hit songs as "I Wished on the Moon", "Love in Bloom" (comedian Jack Benny’s theme song), "Faithful Forever", "Easy Living", "June in January", "Blue Hawaii", and with Leo Robin on the 1938 Oscar-winning song "Thanks for the Memory", sung by Bob Hope in the film The Big Broadcast of 1938.[1]

Rainger paid one year's tuition fees to the Austrian composer Arnold Schönberg in advance, so that Schönberg could pay for the transportation of his belongings to Los Angeles from Paris in 1933.

Rainger died in a plane crash near Palm Springs, California, in 1942. He was a passenger aboard American Airlines Flight 28, a DC-3 airliner that was involved in a midair collision with a U.S. Army Air Corps bomber. Rainger was 41 years old when he died; he was survived by a wife, Elizabeth ("Betty"), an 8-year-old son, and two daughters, ages 5 and 1.[1]

Film credits

For a complete film score list, see: Songwriters Hall of Fame; Ralph Rainger film scores

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Doug Ramsey (December 30, 2008). "Another Who's Been Unjustly Forgotten".  

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.