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Red Line (Pittsburgh)

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Title: Red Line (Pittsburgh)  
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Subject: List of Pittsburgh Light Rail stations, Steel Plaza (PAT station), Pittsburgh Light Rail, List of inclines in Pittsburgh, Allegheny (PAT station)
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Red Line (Pittsburgh)

Red Line
Overview
Type Light rail
Locale Pittsburgh
Operation
Owner Port Authority of Allegheny County
Operator(s) Port Authority of Allegheny County
Technical
Track gauge 5 ft 2 12 in (1,588 mm)
Electrification Overhead lines
Route map
Map of the "T" light rail system

The Red Line (formerly the 42S South Hills Village via Beechview) is a line on the Pittsburgh Light Rail system that runs between South Hills Village and Downtown Pittsburgh via the Beechview neighborhood. Companion routes, the Blue Line - South Hills Village and Blue Line - Library, branch off north of Martin Villa and run through Overbrook. In March 2007, the closure of the Palm Garden Bridge for refurbishment suspended the Red Line for five months; it resumed service in September.[1][2]

Route

The line begins at South Hills Village in Upper St. Clair, and runs north to Washington Junction through Bethel Park, providing a transfer to the Blue Line - Library, which runs via Overbrook. The Red Line continues north through Castle Shannon and Mount Lebanon, then through the Mount Lebanon Rail Tunnel underneath Washington Rd./West Liberty Ave (aka Truck U.S. Route 19) into Dormont at the other end. The first station coming out of the tunnel northbound is Dormont Junction, then line proceeds through this suburb, crossing many streets via grade crossings. The line then arrives at Potomac, where it begins travelling through street trackage about a quarter mile down the tracks, crossing into the neighborhood of Beechview in the city of Pittsburgh near the Neeld Avenue stop.

Before the Mt. Lebanon Rail Tunnel, the old streetcars ran with car traffic on Washington Rd. between Alfred St. in Mt. Lebanon and the intersection of McFarland Rd. and Raleigh Ave. (where Washington Rd. becomes West Liberty Ave.) in Dormont.

At South Hills Junction the Red Line rejoins the Blue Line and the Brown Line, which runs over Mount Washington through the Allentown neighborhood. The Red Line runs through the Mount Washington Transit Tunnel, stopping at Station Square before crossing the Monongahela River on the Panhandle Bridge. Reaching downtown at First Avenue, the Red Line proceeds underground to Steel Plaza, Wood Street and Gateway Center. Upon reaching Gateway, the route then proceeds under the Allegheny River and makes additional stops at North Side and Allegheny stations on the North Shore.

The Port Authority closed seven stations along the Red Line on June 25, 2012: Santa Barbara, Martin Villa, Kelton, Neeld, Boustead, Coast and Traymore.[3] The line was renamed slightly to Red Line - Castle Shannon via Beechview when the North Shore Connector opened.

There is additional limited service to and from Penn Park (at Pittsburgh Amtrak), such as during sporting events.[4]

Station List

Station Name Station Type Other Services Municipality
South Hills Village high level Blue Line - South Hills Village Upper St. Clair
Dorchester street level Blue Line - South Hills Village Bethel Park
Bethel Village street level Blue Line - South Hills Village Bethel Park
Highland street level Blue Line - South Hills Village Bethel Park
Casswell street level Blue Line - South Hills Village Bethel Park
Washington Junction high level Blue Line - South Hills Village, Blue Line - Library Bethel Park
Smith Road street level Blue Line - South Hills Village, Blue Line - Library Castle Shannon
St. Anne's street level Blue Line - South Hills Village, Blue Line - Library Castle Shannon
Overbrook Junction street level Red Line Castle Shannon
Castle Shannon high level Castle Shannon
Arlington street level Castle Shannon
Poplar street level Mt. Lebanon
Mt. Lebanon high level Mt. Lebanon
Dormont Junction high level Dormont
Potomac high level Dormont
Stevenson street level Dormont
Shiras street level Pittsburgh
Belasco street level Pittsburgh
Hampshire street level Pittsburgh
Fallowfield high level Pittsburgh
Westfield street level Pittsburgh
Pennant street level Pittsburgh
Dawn street level Pittsburgh
Palm Garden street level Pittsburgh
South Hills Junction high level Blue Line - Library, Blue Line - South Hills Village, Brown Line Pittsburgh
Station Square high level Blue Line - Library, Blue Line - South Hills Village Pittsburgh
First Avenue high level Blue Line - Library, Blue Line - South Hills Village, Brown Line Pittsburgh
Steel Plaza underground Blue Line - Library, Blue Line - South Hills Village, Brown Line Pittsburgh
Wood Street underground Blue Line - Library, Blue Line - South Hills Village, Brown Line Pittsburgh
Gateway Center underground Blue Line - Library, Blue Line - South Hills Village, Brown Line Pittsburgh
North Side underground Blue Line - Library, Blue Line - South Hills Village, Brown Line Pittsburgh
Allegheny high level Blue Line - Library, Blue Line - South Hills Village, Brown Line Pittsburgh

References

  1. ^ Grata, Joe (2007-02-26). "Bus, trolley riders warned of closing of bridge over Route 51". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2007-04-11. 
  2. ^ Grata, Joe (2007-08-22). "S. Hills bus, trolley disruptions ending Sept. 2". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 
  3. ^ "Eleven T Stops Close June 25". Port Authority of Allegheny County. June 22, 2012. 
  4. ^ Grata, Joe (2006-06-29). "More buses, trolleys for game". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. p. A9. 

External links

  • Red Line - Castle Shannon via Beechview schedule effective March 25, 2012
  • Red Line - Castle Shannon via Beechview Route Map
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