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Religion in Mongolia

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Religion in Mongolia





Religion in Mongolia (census 2010)[1]

  Buddhism (53%)
  Islam (3%)
  Mongolian shamanism (2.9%)
  Christianity (2.1%)
  Other (0.4%)
  Not religious (38.6%)
Mongolian Buddhist architecture
Yurt pavilions of the Dashchoilin Monastery in Ulan Bator, example of aboriginal Mongolian architecture.
Urjinshadduvlin Monastery in Ulan Bator, an example of Sino-Tibetan-influenced Mongolian architecture.
Stupa of Dambadarjaalin Monastery in Ulan Bator.
Mongolian shamanic sacred places
An ovoo on the sacred mount above Dambadarjaalin Monastery in Ulan Bator
Mongol shamanic temple on Chingeltei Uul, near Ulan Bator.
Ovoo at the southern shore of Dörgön Lake, in Khovd, western Mongolia.
Structures of Christian and Islamic communities in Mongolia
Protestant church in Zuunmod, Töv.
Mormon meetinghouse in Sükhbaatar, Selenge.
Mosque in Bayan-Ölgii, a province inhabited predominantly by Kazakh Muslims.

Religion in Mongolia has been traditionally dominated by the schools of Mongolian Buddhism and by Mongolian shamanism, the ethnic religion of the Mongols. Historically, through their Mongol Empire the Mongols were exposed to the influences of Christianity (Nestorianism and Catholicism) and Islam, although these religions never came to dominate. During the socialist period of the Mongolian People's Republic (1924-1992) all religions were suppressed, but with the transition to the parliamentary republic in the 1990s there has been a general revival of faiths.

According to the national census of 2010, 53% of the Mongolians identify as Buddhists, 38.6% as not religious, 3% as Muslims (predominantly of Kazakh ethnicity), 2.9% as followers of the Mongol shamanic tradition, 2.1% as Christians, and 0.4% as followers of other religions.[2] Other sources estimate that a significantly higher proportion of the population follows the Mongol ethnic religion (18.6%).[3]

Demographics

Religion 2010[4]
Number %
Buddhism 1,009,357 53
Islam 57,702 3
Mongolian shamanism 55,174 2.9
Christianity 41,117 2.1
Other religion 6,933 0.4
Not religious 735,283 38.6
Total population 1,905,566 100

Main religions

Buddhism

Mongolian shamanism

Abrahamic religions

Christianity

Islam

See also

References

  1. ^ 2010 Population and Housing Census of Mongolia. Data recorded in Brian J. Grim et al. Yearbook of International Religious Demography 2014. BRILL, 2014. p. 152
  2. ^ 2010 Population and Housing Census of Mongolia. Data recorded in Brian J. Grim et al. Yearbook of International Religious Demography 2014. BRILL, 2014. p. 152
  3. ^ Association of Religion Data Archives: Mongolia: Religious Adherents, 2010. Data from the World Christian Database.
  4. ^ 2010 Population and Housing Census of Mongolia. Data recorded in Brian J. Grim et al. Yearbook of International Religious Demography 2014. BRILL, 2014. p. 152
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