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Repentigny (electoral district)

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Title: Repentigny (electoral district)  
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Repentigny (electoral district)

Repentigny
Quebec electoral district
Repentigny in relation to other Quebec federal electoral districts
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Monique Pauzé
Bloc Québécois
District created 1996
First contested 1997
Last contested 2015
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011)[1] 111,191
Electors (2015) 91,542
Area (km²)[2] 198
Pop. density (per km²) 561.6
Census divisions L'Assomption
Census subdivisions Charlemagne, L'Assomption, L'Épiphanie (city), Repentigny, L'Épiphanie (parish), Saint-Sulpice

Repentigny is a federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1997.

It consists solely and entirely of the Regional County Municipality of L'Assomption.

Contents

  • Demographics 1
  • Political geography 2
  • History 3
    • Member of Parliament 3.1
  • Electoral history 4
    • 2015 federal election 4.1
    • 2011 federal election 4.2
    • 2008 federal election 4.3
    • 2006 by-election 4.4
    • 1997-2006 4.5
  • See also 5
  • References 6
    • Notes 6.1

Demographics

According to the Canada 2001 Census
Population 103,977
Electors 84,312
Area (km²) 266
Population density (people per km²) 390.9

Ethnic groups: 98.7% White
Languages: 97.3% French, 1.1% English, 1.3% Others
Religions: 94.5% Catholic, 1.3% Protestant, 3.4% No religion
Average income: $30,277

Political geography

Repentigny had long been one of the most separatist ridings in Quebec. In the 2006 election, every single poll was won by the Bloc Québécois. However, the riding was caught up in the New Democratic Party tsunami that swept through the province five years later.

History

It was created in 1996 from parts of Joliette and Terrebonne ridings.

It consisted initially of the cities of Charlemagne, Lachenaie, Mascouche and Repentigny; and the Parish Municipality of La Plaine in the County Regional Municipality of Les Moulins.

This riding lost territory to Montcalm during the 2012 electoral redistribution.

Member of Parliament

Parliament Years Member Party
Repentigny
Riding created from Joliette and Terrebonne
36th  1997–2000     Benoît Sauvageau Bloc Québécois
37th  2000–2004
38th  2004–2006
39th  2006–2006
 2006–2008     Raymond Gravel Bloc Québécois
40th  2008–2011     Nicolas Dufour Bloc Québécois
41st  2011–2014     Jean-François Larose New Democratic
 2014–2015     Strength in Democracy
42nd  2015–Present     Monique Pauzé Bloc Québécois

Electoral history

2015 federal election

Canadian federal election, 2015
The 2015 general election will be held on October 19.
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Réjean Bellemare 15175 23.3%
Strength in Democracy Johnathan Cloutier
Liberal Adriana Dudas 17788 27.3%
Green Yoland Gilbert 1242 1.9%
Conservative Jonathan Lefebvre 7053 10.8%
Bloc Québécois Monique Pauzé 22627 34.7%
Total valid votes/Expense limit 100.0     $233,927.60
Total rejected ballots
Turnout
Eligible voters 91,542
Source: Elections Canada[3][4]
2011 federal election redistributed results[5]
Party Vote %
  New Democratic 30,339 52.07
  Bloc Québécois 17,963 30.83
  Liberal 4,613 7.92
  Conservative 4,342 7.45
  Green 1,006 1.73

2011 federal election

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
New Democratic Jean-François Larose 32,131 51.92 +36.77
Bloc Québécois Nicolas Dufour 19,242 31.09 -21.97
Liberal Chantal Perreault 4,830 7.81 -7.17
Conservative Christophe Royer 4,606 7.44 -6.54
Green Michel Duchaine 1,078 1.74 -1.11
Total valid votes/Expense limit 61,887 100.00
Total rejected ballots 934 1.49
Turnout 62,821 66.91
Eligible voters 93,882

2008 federal election

Fr. Gravel chose not to run again, citing pressure from the Church. Party activist Nicolas Dufour secured the Bloc nomination, becoming one of their youngest candidates. Réjean Bellemare ran again for the NDP. The Bloc held the riding handily, with the NDP securing one of the party's four second-place finishes in the province.

Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Bloc Québécois Nicolas Dufour 31,005 53.06 -13.20 $90,525
New Democratic Réjean Bellemare 8,853 15.15 +8.13 $5,448
Liberal Robert Semegen 8,746 14.97 +8.74 $7,684
Conservative Bruno Royer 8,168 13.98 -4.72 $46,962
Green Paul W. Fournier 1,666 2.85 $4,967
Total valid votes/Expense limit 58,438 100.00 $91,738
Turnout 53.3
Bloc Québécois hold Swing -10.7

2006 by-election

MP Benoît Sauvageau was killed in a car accident on August 28, 2006. Prime Minister Stephen Harper called for a by-election on October 22, 2006 with a polling day of November 27, 2006.

There had been a lot of pressure from opposition parties for Public Works Minister Michael Fortier, a Conservative senator, to run here; however, he has declined. Fortier was appointed to the Senate and the Cabinet to represent Greater Montreal which elected no Conservatives in the last federal election, while Fortier pledged to resign from the Senate and seek election to the House of Commons in the next federal election. Instead, the Conservative candidate was Stéphane Bourgon, a lawyer. The Bloc Québécois, of which Sauvageau was a member, ran Raymond Gravel, a Roman Catholic priest.[6] The New Democratic Party candidate was union activist and former Canadian Navy member Réjean Bellemare, who had also run for the NDP in the previous general election.

The Green Party of Canada had announced that Marc-André Gadoury would be their candidate, but he did not complete and submit paperwork to Elections Canada in sufficient time to get on the ballot. Gadoury suggested that the Greens did not submit the paperwork on purpose and on November 25, 2006, La Presse reported that Gadoury was endorsing the NDP candidate, Réjean Bellemare.

Raymond Gravel of the Bloc Québécois won the by-election with an approximately two-thirds majority of votes.

Canadian federal by-election, 27 November 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Bloc Québécois Raymond Gravel 20,635 66.26 +3.84 $84,032
Conservative Stéphane Bourgon 5,822 18.69 +0.61 $46,980
New Democratic Réjean Bellemare 2,187 7.02 -0.72 $34,699
Liberal Christian Turenne 1,940 6.23 -2.42 $15,043
Independent Jocelyne Leduc 390 1.25 n/a $45
Canadian Action Mahmood Raza Baig 91 0.29 n/a $5,641
Independent Régent Millette 78 0.25 n/a
Total valid votes/Expense limit 31,143 100.00 $85,285
Called because of the death of M. Sauvageau on 28 August 2006

1997-2006

Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Bloc Québécois Benoît Sauvageau 34,958 62.42 -7.64 $66,386
Conservative Claude Lafortune, Jr. 10,124 18.08 +13.31 $4,967
Liberal Josyanne Forest 4,847 8.65 -9.6 $8,129
New Democratic Réjean Bellemare 4,337 7.74 +4.76 $7,511
Green Adam Jastrzebski 1,742 3.11 +0.22 $0
Total valid votes/Expense limit 56,008 100.00 $82,825
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Bloc Québécois Benoît Sauvageau 35,907 70.06 +12.26
Liberal Lévis Brien 9,353 18.25 -8.63 $76,485
Conservative Allen F. Mackenzie 2,447 4.77 -5.69 $5,725
New Democratic André Cardinal 1,526 2.98 +1.55
Green Jean-François Lévêque 1,482 2.89 n/a $0
Marijuana François Boudreau 539 1.05 -2.38
Total valid votes/Expense limit 51,254 100.00 $79,823
Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Bloc Québécois Benoît Sauvageau 33,627 57.80 +1.51
Liberal David Veillette 15,635 26.88 +5.75
Progressive Conservative Michel Carignan 3,122 5.37 -15.66
Alliance Michel Paulette 2,964 5.09 n/a
Marijuana Lise Dufour 1,997 3.43 n/a
New Democratic Pierre Péclet 831 1.43 -0.12
Total 58,176 100.00
Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes %
Bloc Québécois Benoît Sauvageau 33,283 56.29
Liberal Robert Tranchemontagne 12,495 21.13
Progressive Conservative Michel Carignan 12,436 21.03
New Democratic Normand Caplette 916 1.55
Total 59,130 100.00

See also

References

  • "(Code 24053) Census Profile".  
  • Campaign expense data from Elections Canada
  • Riding history from the Library of Parliament
  • 2011 Results from Elections Canada

Notes

  1. ^ Statistics Canada: 2012
  2. ^ Statistics Canada: 2012
  3. ^ Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for Repentigny, 30 September 2015
  4. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates
  5. ^ Pundits' Guide to Canadian Elections
  6. ^ [2]

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