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Rib steak

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Rib steak

Rib steak
Beef Cuts
Type Rib cut of beef

A rib steak is a beef steak sliced from the rib primal of a beef animal, with rib bone attached. In the United States, the term rib eye steak is used for a rib steak with the bone removed; however in some areas, and outside the U.S., the terms are often used interchangeably. The rib eye or "ribeye" was originally, as the name implies, the center best portion of the rib steak, without the bone.

It is one of the more flavorful cuts of beef, due to the muscle getting a lot of exercise during its life, unlike the fillet. Its marbling of fat makes this very good for slow roasting and it also goes great on a grill cooked to any degree.

  • Beef ribs are a primal cut of bone-in beef, coming from a single rib or from several ribs out of the carcass.
  • The short ribs: several ribs cut from the rib and plate primals and a small corner of the square-cut chuck.

Terminology

  • In the United States cuisine a bone-attached beef rib can be called "rib steak", "beef rib", "bone-in beef rib", "bone-in rib steak", "ribeye cowboy steak" or "cowboy cut".
  • In Australia a bone-in rib steak is called a "ribeye". When the bone is removed, Australians call the resulting piece of meat a "Scotch fillet" or "whiskey fillet".
  • In the French cuisine the rib steak (with bone attached, called côte de bœuf, literally: "beef rib") is a very popular dish and it is not uncommon to find French restaurants where a massive single côte de bœuf is served for two or more dinner guests. The French entrecôte corresponds to the rib eye steak, that is, a rib steak separated from its bone.
  • In Argentine cuisine roast short ribs are called indistinctly asado de tira or tira de asado. The bone-attached rib steak is called bife de costilla. But when the bone is removed (this is, the rib eye steak) Argentine terminology calls it bife de chorizo, in spite of the fact that no real chorizo is related to the cut of meat itself.
  • In Spanish cuisine, in Spain, a bone-attached rib steak is called chuletón, while the same cut of meat, when its bone is removed, is called, in Spain, entrecot, a word originated in the French entrecôte.

See also

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