World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Richard F. Ericson

Richard Ferdinand Ericson (1919–1993) was an Washington, D.C..

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Work 2
    • Visions of Cybernetic Organizations, 1972 2.1
    • Society for General Systems Research 2.2
  • Publications 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Biography

Richard Ericson received a bachelor's with Phi Beta Kappa and a Masters degree at University of Chicago and received his Doctorate in Economics at Indiana University in 1952.

He was a full Professor at George Washington University, and here in 1969 he became Professor of Management.

Ericson was organizationally active. He was Chairman of the Comparative Administration Task Force, The Academy of Management from 1966 to 1968, and President and Managing Director of the Washington, D.C..[1]

Dr. Ericson was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Beta Gamma Sigma, American Economic Association, American Management Association, Society for General Systems Research, American Cybernetics Association, The Academy of Management, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the World Future Society.[1]

One of his students was the author on management and systems thinking Stephen G. Haines.[2]

Work

Ericson's research interests were in the fields of General Systems and Cybernetics Approaches to Management Theory and Practice, Value Issues in Contemporary Management, GEMSOC.[3] Ericson (1979) believed that "society has now thrust upon it a kind of moral imperative to focus efforts on the utilization of general systems concepts and conceptualizations by policy-forming executives, administrators, and [4]

Visions of Cybernetic Organizations, 1972

In his 1972 paper "Visions of Cybernetic Organizations" Ericson stipulated, that in his days a great number of people associated the word "cybernetics" with "computerized information networks, closed loop systems, and robotized man-surrogates, such as artorgas and cyborgs."[5]

The essence of the cybernetic organization, Ericson argued is that "they are self-controlling, self-maintaining, self-realizing. Indeed, cybernetics has been characterized as the science of effective organization, in just these terms."[5] In modern organizational cybernetics, the organization is viewed as "a subsystem of a larger system(s), and as comprised itself of functionally interdependent subsystems."[6]

Society for General Systems Research

Ericson was president of the [4]

Publications

Ericson has written and edited several books and articles.[7] A selection:

  • 1969. Organizational cybernetics and human values. Program of Policy Studies in Science and Technology. Monograph. George Washington University.
  • 1969. Toward increasing the social relevance of the contemporary university. Program of Policy Studies in Science and Technology, George Washington University.
  • 1968. The impact of cybernetic information technology on management value systems. Program of Policy Studies in Science and Technology, George Washington University.
  • 1971. The policy analysis role of the contemporary university. Program of Policy Studies in Science and Technology. Reprint.P rogram of Policy Studies in Science and Technology, George Washington University.
  • 1978. Avoiding social catastrophes and maximizing social opportunities : the general systems challenge : proceedings of the 22nd annual North American meeting, Washington, D.C., February 13–15, 1978. Richard F. Ericson, proceedings coordinator. Washington : Society for General Systems Research.
  • 1979. Improving the Human Condition; quality and stability in social systems. Edited. Washington, Society for General Systems Research.
Articles, a selection
  • 1958. "Should Management be Idealistic?" Harvard Business Review, September/October 1958.
  • 1963. "Toward a Universally Viable Philosophy of Management". In: Management Technology, Vol. 3, No. 1 (May, 1963), pp. 33–55
  • 1966. "Research Scholar's View of Administrative Theory," Proceedings of The Academy of Management, March 1966;
  • 1969. Toward Increasing the Social Relevance of the Contemporary University, Program of Policy Studies, August 1969;
  • 1969. "The Impact of Cybernetic Information Technology on Management Value Systems," Management Science, October, 1969
  • 1972. "Visions of Cybernetic Organizations". In: The Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 15, No. 4, General Systems Theory (Dec., 1972), pp. 427–443.
  • 1970. "The policy analysis role of the contemporary university". In: Journal Policy Sciences. Issue Volume 1, Number 1 / March, 1970. Pages 429-442.
  • 1985. "Thinking and Management Values in the Microchip Era: An Action Agenda for Institutional Transformation". In: Systems Research 2 (vol. 1), 1985, pp. 29–32.

References

  1. ^ a b Richard F. Ericson (1969). Organizational cybernetics and human values. Program of Policy Studies in Science and Technology. Monograph. George Washington University.
  2. ^ Stephen G. Haines (2000). The Complete Guide to Systems Thinking & Learning. page v.
  3. ^ "Professor Emeritus" at management.gwu.edu George Washington University. Retrieved 9 June 2009.
  4. ^ a b Ericson (1969) cited in: Brian R. Gaines Ed. "General systems research: quo vadis?" in: General Systems: Yearbook of the Society for General Systems Research, Vol.24, 1979, pp.1-9.
  5. ^ a b Ericson (1972, p. 427)
  6. ^ Ericson (1969, p. 14-15.)
  7. ^ Ericson, Richard F. (Richard Ferdinand) 1919- at worldcat.org. Accessed March 26, 2013

External links

  • The Day The Constitution Died. Personal website of Ericson's son Kurt Ericson.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.