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Roosevelt Arch

A picture of the Roosevelt Arch.

The Roosevelt Arch is a

Contents

  • Roosevelt Arch 1
  • Construction 2
  • Notes 3
  • See also 4

Roosevelt Arch

Before 1903, trains brought visitors to Cinnabar, Montana, which was a few miles northwest of Gardiner, Montana, where people would transfer onto horse-drawn coaches to enter the park. In 1903, the railway finally came to Gardiner, and people entered through the stone archway.

Construction

The design of the Roosevelt Arch has been attributed to architect Robert Reamer, but documentation is inconclusive. Construction of the arch began on February 19, 1903, and was completed on August 15, 1903, at a cost of about $10,000. The archway was built at the north entrance, which was the first major entrance for Yellowstone. President Roosevelt was visiting Yellowstone during construction and was asked to place the cornerstone for the arch, which then took his name. The cornerstone Roosevelt laid covered a time capsule that contains a Bible, a picture of Roosevelt, local newspapers, and other items.[1]

The idea of the arch is attributed to Hiram Martin Chittenden. Several thousand people came to Gardiner for the dedication, including John F. Yancey, who caught a chill and died in Gardiner as a result.

Notes

  1. ^ McMillion, Scott. "Roosevelt Arch turns 100." Bozeman Daily Chronicle, 24 April 2003.
  • "Mammoth Area Historic Highlights". National Park Service. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  • Whittlesey, Lee H.; Schullery, Paul (Summer 2003). "The Roosevelt Arch: A Centennial History of an American Icon". Yellowstone Science (National Park Service). 

See also

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