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Sapindales

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Title: Sapindales  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Burseraceae, APG III system, Sapindales, Meliaceae, Leitneria
Collection: Angiosperm Orders, Sapindales
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Sapindales

Sapindales
Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Sapindales
Dumortier
Families

See text

Sapindales is a botanical name for an order of flowering plants. Well-known members of Sapindales include citrus; maples, horse-chestnuts, lychees and rambutans; mangos and cashews; frankincense and myrrh; mahogany and neem.

The APG III system of 2009 includes it in the clade malvids (in rosids, in eudicots) with the following 9 families:[1][2][3]

The APG II system of 2003 allowed the optional segregation of families now included in the Nitrariaceae.

Trichostetha bicolor beetles feeding on flowers of Agathosma capensis (Rutaceae).

The Cronquist system of 1981 used a somewhat different circumscription, including the following families:

The difference from the APG III system is not as large as may appear, as the plants in the families Aceraceae and Hippocastanaceae stay in this order at APG III (both included in family Sapindaceae). The species now composing the family Nitrariaceae in APG III also belonged to this order in the Cronquist system as part of the family Zygophyllaceae, while those now in the family Kirkiaceae were present as part of the family Simaroubaceae.

References

  1. ^ Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III (2009). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG III". Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 161 (2): 105–121.  
  2. ^ Muellner, A. N.; D. D. Vassiliades; S. S. Renner (2007). "Placing Biebersteiniaceae, a herbaceous clade of Sapindales, in a temporal and geographic context". Plant Systematics and Evolution 266: 233–252.  
  3. ^ Stevens, P.F. ((2001 onwards)). "Angiosperm Phylogeny Website. Version 9, June 2008 [and more or less continuously updated since].". Missouri Botanical Garden. 
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