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Sayur asem

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Title: Sayur asem  
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Subject: Sundanese cuisine, Sayur lodeh, Nasi timbel, Indonesia, Indonesian cuisine
Collection: Indonesian Soups, Sundanese Cuisine, Vegetable Dishes of Indonesia, Vegetarian Dishes of Indonesia
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Sayur asem

Sayur asem
Sayur asem
Course main course
Place of origin Indonesia
Region or state Jakarta, West Java, Banten
Creator Sundanese cuisine and Betawi cuisine
Serving temperature hot and room temperature
Main ingredients various vegetables in tamarind soup
Cookbook:Sayur asemĀ 

Sayur asem or sayur asam is a popular Indonesian tamarind dish. Common ingredients are peanuts, young jackfruit, melinjo, bilimbi, chayote, long beans, all cooked in tamarind-based soups and sometimes enriched with beef stock. Quite often, the recipe also includes corn.

The origin of the dish can be traced to Sundanese people of West Java, Banten and Jakarta region. It is well-known belongs within Sundanese cuisine and Betawi daily diet. Several variations exist including sayur asem Jakarta (a version from the Betawi people of Jakarta), sayur asem kangkung (a version which includes water spinach), sayur asem ikan asin (includes salted fish, usually snakehead murrel), and sayur asem kacang merah (consists of red beans and green beans in tamarind and beef stock). The Karo version of sayur asem is made using torch ginger buds and, more importantly, the sour-tasting seed pods.

The sweet and sour flavour of this dish is considered refreshing and very compatible with fried or grilled dishes, including fish and lalapan, a kind of vegetable salad usually raw but can also be cooked, and is usually eaten with sambal terasi.

External links

  • (Indonesian) Sayur Asem Jakarta version


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