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Set design

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Set design

For film and television, see production design.



Scenic design (also known as scenography, stage design, set design or production design) is the creation of theatrical, as well as film or television scenery. Scenic designers have traditionally come from a variety of artistic backgrounds, but nowadays, generally speaking, they are trained professionals, often self taught with a M.F.A. degrees in theatre arts. Scenic art should provide an experience that engages your heart and mind. It takes you to a person, place or thing that can cause us to value it.

Scenic Designer

A designer looks at the details searching for evidence through research to produce conceptual ideas that’s best toward supporting the content and values with visual elements. The subject of, “How do we generate creative ideas?” is a very legitimate question. The most consuming part of expanding our horizons toward scenic concepts is much more than witnessing creativity, and creative people. It starts with us opening our mind to the possibilities. To have an attitude toward learning, seeking, and engaging in creativity and to be willing to be adventurous, inquisitive and curious. Our imagination is highly visual. Whether outside or inside, colorful trees or concerts, star lit skies or the architecture of a great building, scenic design is a process of discovery. Discovering what will best clarify and support the story being told.

The scenic designer works with the director and other designers to establish an overall visual concept for the production and design the stage environment. He is responsible for developing a complete set of design drawings that include the following:

  • basic ground plan showing all stationary scenic elements;
  • composite ground plan showing all moving scenic elements, indicating both their onstage and storage positions;
  • section of the stage space incorporating all elements;
  • front elevations of every scenic element, and additional elevations or sections of units as required.

All of these required drawing elements can be easily created from one accurate 3-D CAD model of the set design.



Responsibility

The scenic designer is responsible for collaborating with the theatre director and other members of the production design team to create an environment for the production and then communicating the details of this environment to the technical director, production manager, charge scenic artist and propmaster. Scenic designers are responsible for creating scale models of the scenery, renderings, paint elevations and scale construction drawings as part of their communication with other production staff.

Training

In Europe and Australia[1] scenic designers take a more holistic approach to theatrical design and will often be responsible not only for scenic design but costume, lighting and sound and are referred to as theatre designers or scenographers or production designers.

Like their American cousins, ] or performance design.

Notable scenic designers, past and present, include: Adolphe Appia, Aleksandra Ekster, Glenn Davis, Alexandre Benois, Alison Chitty, Antony McDonald, Barry Kay, Boris Aronson, Cyro Del Nero], Daniil Lider, David Borovsky, David Gallo, Edward Gordon Craig, Es Devlin, Ezio Frigerio, Franco Colavecchia, Franco Zeffirelli, George Tsypin, Howard Bay, Inigo Jones, Jean-Pierre Ponnelle, Jo Mielziner, Josef Svoboda, Ken Adam, Léon Bakst, Luciano Damiani, Maria Björnson, Ming Cho Lee, Motley, Natalia Goncharova, Nathan Altman, Nicholas Georgiadis, Paul Brown, Oliver Smith, Ralph Koltai, Neil Patel, Robert Brill, Robert Wilson, Russell Patterson, Brian Sidney Bembridge, Santo Loquasto, Sean Kenny, Todd Rosenthal, Robin Wagner, Tony Walton, and Vadym Meller.Lez Brotherston.Michael Vale, Belinda Ackermann, Christopher Baugh, Phillip Prowse, Andre Serban, Jonathan Polkest,

See also

References

Further reading

  • Making the Scene: A History of Stage Design and Technology in Europe and the United States by Oscar G. Brockett, Margaret Mitchell, and Linda Hardberger (Tobin Theatre Arts Fund, distributed by University of Texas Press; 2010) 365 pages; traces the history of scene design since the ancient Greeks.

External links

  • Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space - the largest scenography event in the world - presenting contemporary work in a variety of performance design disciplines and genres - costume, stage, light, sound design, and theatre architecture for dance, opera, drama, site specific, multi-media performances, and performance art, etc., Prague, CZ
  • What is Scenography Article illustrating the differences between US and European theatre design practices

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