World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Share-alike

Article Id: WHEBN0000960532
Reproduction Date:

Title: Share-alike  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Copyleft, Creative Commons license, CrimethInc. N©! license, Creative Commons, Free software
Collection: Copyleft, Free Software, Public Copyright Licenses
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Share-alike

The Creative Commons icon for Share-Alike, a variant of the copyleft symbol

Share-alike is a copyright licensing term, originally used by the Creative Commons project, to describe works or licences that require copies or adaptations of the work to be released under the same or similar licence as the original.[1] Copyleft licences are free content or free software licences with a share-alike condition.

Two currently-supported Creative Commons licences have the ShareAlike condition: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (a copyleft, free content licence) and Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (a proprietary licence).

The term has also been used outside copyright law to refer to a similar plan for patent licensing.[2]

Contents

  • Copyleft 1
  • Creative Commons 2
  • History of Creative Commons ShareAlike Versions 3
  • Adoption 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6

Copyleft

Copyleft or libre share-alike licences are the largest subcategory of share-alike licences. They include both free content licences like Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike and free software licences like the GNU General Public License. These licences have been described pejoratively as viral licences, because the inclusion of copyleft material in a larger work typically requires the entire work to be made copyleft. The term reciprocal license has also been used to describe copyleft, but has also been used for non-libre licenses (see, for example, the Microsoft Limited Reciprocal License).

Free content and software licences without the share-alike requirement are described as permissive licences.

Creative Commons

As with all six licences in the current Creative Commons suite, CC Attribution-ShareAlike and CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike require attribution. According to Creative Commons, the advantage of this license is that future users are not able to add new restrictions to a derivative of your work; their derivatives must be licensed the same way.[3]

The 3.0 and 4.0 version of the ShareAlike licenses include a compatibility clause, allowing Creative Commons to declare other licenses as compatible and therefore derivatives may use these instead of the license of the original work.

History of Creative Commons ShareAlike Versions

Over the years, Creative Commons has issued 5 versions of the BY-SA and BY-NC-SA licenses (1.0, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 4.0).

  • Attribution-ShareAlike Version 1.0 Generic[4] and Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Version 1.0 Generic[5] - Released December, 2002
  • Attribution-ShareAlike Version 2.0 Generic[6] and Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Version 2.0 Generic[7] - Released May, 2004
  • Attribution-ShareAlike Version 2.5 Generic[8] and Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Version 2.5 Generic[9] - Released June, 2005
  • Attribution-ShareAlike Version 3.0 Unported[10] and Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Version 3.0 Unported[11] - Released March, 2007
  • Attribution-ShareAlike Version 4.0 International[12] and Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Version 4.0 International[13] - Released November, 2013

Adoption

In June, 2009 the WorldHeritage community and Wikimedia Foundation board approved the adoption of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike (CC BY-SA) license as the main content license for WorldHeritage and other Wikimedia sites. Creative Commons hailed this decision as a victory for free culture as well as visionary leadership.[14]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Glossary". Retrieved 2012-03-05. 
  2. ^ "Share-Alike Patents". Retrieved 2012-03-05. 
  3. ^ "Share Alike". Retrieved 2010-12-17. 
  4. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 1.0 Generic — CC BY-SA 1.0". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  5. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 1.0 Generic — CC BY-NC-SA 1.0". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  6. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic — CC BY-SA 2.0". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  7. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic — CC BY-NC-SA 2.0". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  8. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 Generic — CC BY-SA 2.5". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  9. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 Generic — CC BY-NC-SA 2.5". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  10. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  11. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-NC-SA 3.0". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2013-10-06. 
  12. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International — CC BY-SA 4.0". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2014-05-15. 
  13. ^ "Creative Commons — Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International — CC BY-NC-SA 4.0". Creativecommons.org. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2014-05-15. 
  14. ^ "WorldHeritage + CC BY-SA = Free Culture Win!". 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.