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Sherlock Holmes and the House of Fear

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Sherlock Holmes and the House of Fear

Sherlock Holmes and the House of Fear
1945 theatrical poster
Directed by Roy William Neill
Produced by Roy William Neill
Written by Roy Chanslor
Based on "The Adventure of the Five Orange Pips" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Starring Basil Rathbone
Nigel Bruce
Aubrey Mather
Music by Paul Sawtell
Cinematography Virgil Miller
Edited by Saul A. Goodkind
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
  • March 16, 1945 (1945-03-16)
Running time 69 min
Country United States
Language English

Sherlock Holmes and the House of Fear (promoted simply as The House of Fear) is a 1945 crime film directed by Roy William Neill. It is loosely based on The Five Orange Pips by Arthur Conan Doyle, and features the characters Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. It is the 10th film of the Rathbone/Bruce series.

Plot

Holmes is visited by Mr. Chalmers, an insurance agent with a strange tale. Seven elderly single men, calling themselves "The Good Comrades", live together in the remote Scottish castle of Drearcliffe House, near the village of Inverneill. Recently one of the "Good Comrades" received a strange message, an envelope containing nothing but seven orange pips. That night, he was murdered and his body horribly mutilated. A few days later, the second envelope was delivered, this time containing six pips, and the recipient also died mysteriously soon afterwards, his battered corpse being recovered from the base of the cliffs. Chalmers holds £100,000 of life insurance policies on the seven men, and suspects that one is systematically murdering the others in order to collect the money, and begs Holmes to investigate.

Holmes and Watson arrive at the scene only to find another murder has occurred. This man received five orange pips, and his body was burned to a crisp. Lestrade also arrives to investigate. Despite Holmes' best efforts, three more deaths occur, each time leaving the victim's body unrecognisable.

Lestrade jumps to the obvious conclusion, that the last surviving member, Mr. Bruce Alistair, murdered all the others. However, after Watson goes missing, Holmes has deduced the truth and leads Lestrade (and Alistair) to a secret room where all the "Good Comrades" - alive and well - are hiding with Watson tied up. Holmes explains that Alistair was the victim of a plot to frame him for murder and collect the insurance money by the other six.[1] They even killed the local tobacconist, Alec MacGregor, because he didn't believe in ghosts and saw one of the presumed-dead comrades on the beach alive and wrote a note to Lestrade. Unfortunately, the note was intercepted and read before it reached Holmes.

Cast

References

  1. ^ Davies, David Stuart, Holmes of the Movies (New English Library, 1976) ISBN 0-450-03358-9

External links

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