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Shwe Nawrahta

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Shwe Nawrahta

Shwe Nawrahta nat

Shwe Nawrahta (ရွှေနော်ရထာ, pronounced: ) is one of the 37 nats in the Burmese pantheon of nats. He is the merged personalities of two historic Nawrahtas. The first source is Anawrahta of Ava, son in law of King Minkhaung I of Ava. Anawrahta was appointed governor of Arakan in 1406, and later married to the king's daughter Saw Pye Chantha. In November 1407, Razadarit's Hanthawaddy troops captured Launggyet (Arakan's then capital), and took Anawrahta and Saw Pye Chantha prisoner to Pathein. On arrival, Anawrahta was executed, and his wife passed into Razadarit's harem as a full queen.[1] The second source is Nawrahta of Yamethin, grandson of King Minkhaung II of Ava and the eldest son of King Thihathura. In November 1501 (Natdaw 863 ME, 11 November to 9 December 1501), he ordered his servant Nga Thaukkya to assassinate the new king Shwenankyawshin. Thaukkya's attempt failed; he was caught and put to death. Nawrahta lived in the palace so he was easily caught; being of royal blood, he was drowned.[2][3]

Shwe Nawrahta is portrayed sitting with one knee raised upon a simple throne, holding a gu lee ball in one hand and a gu lee stick in the other.[4][5]

References

  1. ^ Harvey 1925: 91–92
  2. ^ Hmannan Vol. 2 2003: 120
  3. ^ Harvey 1925: 105
  4. ^ Hla Thamein, Thirty-Seven Nats
  5. ^ Khin Maung Nyunt, The Equestrian Festival

References

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