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Simon Greenall

Simon Greenall
Born (1958-01-03) 3 January 1958
Longtown, Cumberland, England, UK
Occupation Actor, writer, producer, voice artist

Simon Greenall (born 3 January 1958) is an English actor, writer, producer and voice artist. Born in Longtown, Cumberland, he is best known for his role as Michael in the TV series I'm Alan Partridge and as the voice of headmaster Iqbal in Bromwell High.

Career

Greenall has appeared in the TV series The Bill, Holby City, Harry Enfield and Chums, Monkey Dust, People Like Us, Doc Martin, Time Gentlemen Please, as Mr Skinner in the 2006 Doctor Who episode "Love & Monsters" and as the voice of Mervin in the MTV puppet show "Fur TV". His film credits include Wimbledon. He wrote for and appeared in Harry Enfield's Brand Spanking New Show. He also contributed his voice to the video games Dragon Quest VIII and Tomb Raider II, among several others. He plays several characters in the British version of The Mr. Men Show, provides the speaking voice of Captain Barnacles in CBeebies' The Octonauts and played the Caretaker in the CBBC game shows Trapped! and Trapped! Ever After.

In the second series of Saxondale that started to air on BBC Two and BBC HD on 23 August 2007, Greenall was reunited with I'm Alan Partridge star Steve Coogan. He played an ex-roadie friend of Tommy (Coogan) who has since become the managing director of a sleek technology company. He plays a variety of different roles in popular BBC Radio 2 sitcom On the Blog. He was one of Grant Bovey's sparring partners when he was training for the BBC charity boxing match against comedian Ricky Gervais.

In 2002, he appeared in the Chris Morris production "My Wrongs 8245-8249 and 117" in which he played a brief role as the father of a child being baptised. In 2007, he provided the voice of Prince Charming in the Anglo-Franco-Belgian adult-animated comedy Snow White: The Sequel alongside the voices of Stephen Fry as the narrator and Rik Mayall as the Seven Dwarves. He currently provides the voice in the Weetabix adverts and is also the voice of Aleksandr Orlov the meerkat in the comparethemarket.com adverts.[1]

He appears in the Channel 4 sitcom Pete versus Life as one of the two commentators remarking on the title character's life. He also voices the character of Murgo in the Fable videogame franchise. Since October 2010, he has been responsible for voicing the character of Captain Barnacles Bear in The Octonauts. In 2011, he appeared in the BBC drama Holy Flying Circus. He was credited as co-executive producer of the 2011 film adaptation of We Need to Talk About Kevin.[2]

In December 2011, Greenall voiced three Viz Comedy Blaps for Channel 4.[3] In 2013, he returned to his role of Michael in the feature film Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa. In 2014, he starred as a Cornish person and Mebyon Kernow member in the BBC series W1A. Actual Mebyon Kernow leader Dick Cole suggested Simon "wasn't nearly as handsome as any of the Mebyon Kernow front bench."[4] He currently plays the Sid James character part in BBC Radio's Missing Hancocks series, in which the cast recreate the original Hancock roles in re-recordings of original scripts where the original recordings of the episodes have been wiped. He plays the role of "Ron Bone" - manager of The Mallard Theatre - in BBC Radio 4's sit-com "The Simon Day Show", from 2012 (6 half-hour-long episodes) - also repeated several times through the years on BBC Radio 4 Extra.

References

  1. ^ Digital Arts staff. "How Passion created Aleks the billionaire meerkat". Digital Arts. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 
  2. ^ "Simon Greenall". IMDb. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 
  3. ^ "Viz Animation – "Blap" to basics". Skwigly. 2011-12-12. Retrieved 2012-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Cllr Dick Cole". mebyonkernow.blogspot.co.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 

External links

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