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Sir Thomas Tipping, 1st Baronet

 

Sir Thomas Tipping, 1st Baronet

Sir Thomas Tipping (1653–1718) was a late 17th-century English baronet and Member of Parliament.

Sir Thomas was the second son, but tenth child, of Sir Thomas Tipping of Wheatfield, Oxfordshire by his wife, Elizabeth, daughter and co-heiress of Sir White Beconshaw of Moyles Court at Ellingham, Hampshire. Thomas Senior was the nephew of the Puritan writer, William 'Eternity' Tipping. Sir Thomas Junior's wife, Anne the daughter of Thomas Cheke, had inherited Pyrgo Park at Havering-atte-Bower in Essex in 1659 and the couple inherited Wheatfield Park in 1693. They had two daughters – Letitia wife of Samuel Sandys, 1st Baron Sandys and Catherine wife of Thomas Archer, 1st Baron Archer – and a son, Thomas.

Tipping became a notorious whig and was elected a Member of Parliament for Oxfordshire (1685) and then Wallingford (1689, 1695 and 1698). He was known for promoting for a proviso to the bill for preserving James II's person which allowed clergymen to speak out against Roman Catholicism. Later, however, he became infamous for having contrived to marry his ward to a prostitute of his acquaintance. He fled to the Netherlands for a while. He was listed as being opposed to the King in 1688 and joined William III upon his landing in England. Tipping then became an outspoken opponent of Judge Jeffreys who had condemned to death, his maternal aunt Dame Alice Lisle.

He was made a baronet in 1698 but died in debt, in prison, in Southwark on 1 July 1718.

See also

List of deserters from James II to William of Orange

References

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