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Société de transport de Laval

 

Société de transport de Laval

Société de transport de Laval
Founded 1971
Headquarters 2250 Francis-Hughes Av.
Locale Laval, Quebec
Service area Laval
Service type Bus service, paratransit
Routes 44[1]
Stops 2,614[1][2]
Hubs Le Carrefour Terminus,
Cartier Terminus,
Montmorency Terminus,
Henri-Bourassa North Terminus,
Côte-Vertu Terminus
Stations 456 (shelters)[1][2]
Fleet 225 buses[1][2]
Daily ridership 55,069 (or 20.1 million per year)[1][2]
Fuel type B5 Biodesel[3]
Chief executive Jean-Jacques Beldié
Website English language site

Société de transport de Laval (STL) is the public transit system in the city of Laval, Quebec, Canada. It was founded in June 1971 as the Commission de transport de la Ville de Laval (CTL). STL came about in 1984.

It serves the growing suburban areas of Laval, North of Montreal.

A proposal to convert some of STL's most heavily used routes to electric trolleybuses was studied in detail in 2009–2010, funded jointly by STL and Hydro-Québec,[4] but in autumn 2010 STL decided to postpone making a decision on trolleybuses until at least 2011, to allow further study of rechargeable electric buses first.[5]

Contents

  • Routes 1
    • Route List 1.1
  • Metro 2
  • Commuter rail 3
    • Saint-Jérôme Line 3.1
    • Deux-Montagnes Line 3.2
  • Transfer points 4
    • See also 4.1
  • Fleet 5
  • Proposed trolleybus system 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Routes

The STL runs 40 routes, including the former AMT's, now STL's 902 Express Route in Laval. Most bus routes end at metro stations Cartier and/or Montmorency of the Orange Line. All buses go to at least one metro, except for lines 66, 402 & 404. There is now one night route on the STL, route 2. In addition some of the daytime bus routes go up to 3:30 a.m. The STL also operates 6 collective taxi routes (T03 - along Saulnier Street, T07 - Rangs Haut-St-François & St-Elzéar sectors, T10 - along av. des Perron, T11 - in Fabreville, T12 - in NW Chomedey and T14 from Laval West to Saint Eustache).[6]

In addition, the STL has added 2 trainbuses. The 402, which services residents in Fabreville, Laval West and Sainte-Dorothée. Its intention is to allow users to reach the Sainte-Dorothée train station. The 404, which also services residents in Sainte-Dorothée, allows users to reach the train station, which is operated by the AMT, to travel to Montreal. Both train-bus routes were inaugurated on April 28, 2007, the same day the Laval Metro was officially opened.

Route List

  • 2 Henri Bourassa Metro-Montmorency Metro,
    via Cartier Metro and de la Concorde Metro
  • 12 Pont Viau-Cartier Metro
  • 17 Auteuil-Cartier Metro
  • 20 Chomedey-Cartier Metro
  • 24 Sainte Dorothee-Cartier Metro
  • 25 Saint Francois-Cartier Metro
  • 26 Sainte Dorothee-Montmorency Metro
  • 27 Vimont-Cartier Metro
  • 28 Saint Vincent de Paul-Cartier Metro
  • 31 Auteuil-Henri Bourassa Metro, via Cartier Metro
  • 33 Montmorency Metro-Cartier Metro
  • 37 Chomedey-Cartier Metro
  • 39 Auteuil-Le Carrefour
  • 40 Chomedey-Montmorency Metro
  • 41 Auteuil-Cartier Metro
  • 42 Saint Francois-Le Carrefour
  • 43 Auteuil-Cartier Metro
  • 45 Chomedey-Montmorency Metro
  • 46 Laval Ouest-Montmorency Metro
  • 48 Duvernay-Cartier Metro
  • 50 Saint Vincent de Paul-Le Carrefour
  • 52 Saint Francois-Metro Henri Bourassa
  • 55 Laval Ouest-Metro Henri Bourassa
  • 56 Sainte Dorothee-Montmorency Metro
  • 58 Saint Vincent de Paul-Cartier Metro
  • 60 Chomedey-Cartier Metro
  • 61 Fabreville-Montmorency Metro
  • 63 Sainte Rose-Cartier Metro
  • 65 Sainte Rose-Montmorency Metro
  • 66 Sainte Dorothee-Le Carrefour
  • 70 Cartier Metro-Montmorency Metro
  • 73 Fabreville-Cartier Metro
  • 74 Saint Francois-Cartier Metro
  • 76 Sainte Dorothee-Montmorency Metro
  • 144 Sainte Dorothee-Cote Vertu Metro
  • 151 Sainte Rose-Cote Vertu Metro
  • 252 Saint Francois-Metro Henri Bourassa
  • 402 Sainte Rose-Sainte Dorothee
  • 404 Sainte Dorothee-Gare Sainte Dorothee
  • 901 Saint Francois-Cartier Metro
  • 902 Le Carrefour-Cote Vertu Metro
  • 903 Montmorency Metro-Gare Sainte Dorothee
  • 904 Pont-Viau - Saint Michel Metro
  • 925 Saint-François-Radisson Metro

Metro

The Montreal Metro is extended into Laval, and connects with STL at three new stations:

  • Cartier (Nearby intersections: Cartier Blvd/Laurentides Blvd, Cartier Blvd/Major St): 21 routes, plus one night route
  • De la Concorde (Nearby intersections: Concorde Blvd/Ampere Ave, Concorde Blvd/Laval Blvd): 3 routes, plus one night route
  • Montmorency (Nearby intersections: Jacques-Tétrault St/Lucien-Paiement St, Jacques-Tétrault St/De l'Avenir Blvd): 15 routes, plus one night route

Commuter rail

STL also connects with AMT commuter trains at:

Saint-Jérôme Line

Deux-Montagnes Line

Transfer points

There are also bus transfer facilities at:

  • Terminus Le Carrefour (across the street from Carrefour Laval) (corner of Le Carrefour Blvd and Terry-Fox Ave) - 11 routes (including former AMT, now STL since January 1, 2008, express 902, and a new express 903). See map
  • Centre Laval - 8 routes. There is no terminus; all routes stop either on bl. Le Corbusier or on bl. du Souvenir if not on both. See map
  • Montmorency- 16 routes See map ]
  • De La Concorde - 4 routes See map ]
  • Cartier - 22 routes See map ]
  • Terminus Laval - 5 routes See map ]
  • Galeries du Moulin - 2 routes See map ]
  • Montgolfier Terminal (corner of Notre-Dame and Montgolfier) - 3 routes See map ]
  • Terminus Méga Centre Ste-Dorothée (Samson and Cléophas-Charbonneau) - 4 routes See map ]
  • Terminus Carole (Carole and Saint-Martin) - 3 routes See map ]
  • Saint-Martin and 100th Av. - 3 routes (including share taxi T-12) See map ]
  • Gare Ste-Dorothée - 6 routes, which include the STL 804(pilot project) See map ]
  • Terminus Laval-Ouest (Arthur-Sauvé and 14th St) - 3 routes (including share taxi T-14 to Terminus Saint-Eustache) See map ]
    • (Arthur-Sauvé and Sainte-Rose) - 6 routes (including share taxi T-14 to Terminus Saint-Eustache) See map
  • Terminus Justin (Justin and Hydro-Québec power line) - 2 routes See map ]
  • Terminus Bienville - 2 routes See map ]
  • Terminus Paré - 3 routes See map ]
  • Terminus Chartrand/Déry - 3 routes See map ]
  • Terminus Pénitencier - 5 routes (including share taxi T-07) See map ]
    • (Lévesque Est and Montée-St-François) - 4 more routes See map ]
  • Gare Ste-Rose - 3 routes See map ]
  • Gare Vimont - 2 routes See map ]
  • Terminus St-Elzéar (St-Elzéar Est and René-Laennec) - 5 routes (including share taxi T07) See map
    • (René-Laennec Boulevard and Dagenais Est) - 1 more route See map
  • For other maps, see "External links" of the respective articles under "Interactive STL map"

There are also connections to other transit services in the region:

See also

Fleet

Handicapped/disabled access denotes wheelchair access

Proposed trolleybus system

In conjunction with Hydro-Québec and the provincial government, STL is considering the idea of constructing a trolleybus system in Laval.[4] A feasibility study began in spring 2009[7] and was completed in autumn 2010.[5] Proponents of the idea, including Laval Mayor Gilles Vaillancourt, have said that replacing diesel buses with trolleybuses would bring a significant reduction in harmful pollutants but would be far less costly than a tramway (streetcar) alternative being favoured by Montreal and also be less disruptive to existing streets.[8]

In discussing the Laval study, some provincial officials indicated they would like to see transport agencies in other major Quebec cities also consider installing trolleybus networks.[4] On completion of the study, the Laval transit authority decided to experiment with rechargeable battery-powered buses before making a decision on whether to proceed with trolleybuses.[5][9] Among the points noted in the study's findings were that installing a trolleybus system would require a significant initial capital investment in infrastructure, but that trolleybuses are a technology known to be able to operate reliably in harsh winter temperatures, and it is uncertain whether other types of electric buses would be able to do so.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Bird's-eye view of the STL". Société de transport de Laval. Retrieved 2014-09-29. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Brief view of the STL". Société de transport de Laval. Retrieved 2008-12-22. 
  3. ^ "IN LAVAL, THE BUSES RUN ON BIODIESEL FUEL". Société de transport de Laval. Retrieved 2008-12-22. 
  4. ^ a b c LeBlanc, Benoit (March 18, 2009). "Trolleybuses in Laval? STL and Hydro-Québec launch feasibility study". Courrier Laval. Retrieved 2010-11-11. 
  5. ^ a b c d "STL to test all-electric buses" (PDF) (Press release). STL. 2 November 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-11. 
  6. ^ Shared taxi
  7. ^ "Trolleybus in Laval?" (PDF) (Press release). STL. March 16, 2009. Retrieved 2010-10-02. 
  8. ^ Riga, Andy (March 17, 2009). "Laval ponders installing trolleys".  
  9. ^ Riga, Andy (November 3, 2010). "Laval transit agency to test electric buses before trolleys". Montreal Gazette. Retrieved 2010-11-11. 

External links

  • Société de transport de laval website
  • Schedules
  • 2011 Current STL System Map (French Only)
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