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Solder mask

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Title: Solder mask  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Dip soldering, Bead probe technology, PCB (software), Printed circuit board, Soldering
Collection: Electronics Manufacturing, Printed Circuit Board Manufacturing
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Solder mask

Printed circuit board with green solder mask coating.

Solder mask or solder stop mask or solder resist is a thin lacquer-like layer of polymer that is usually applied to the copper traces of a printed circuit board (PCB) for protection against oxidation and to prevent solder bridges from forming between closely spaced solder pads. A solder bridge is an unintended electrical connection between two conductors by means of a small blob of solder. PCBs use solder masks to prevent this from happening. Solder mask is not always used for hand soldered assemblies, but is essential for mass-produced boards that are soldered automatically using reflow or solder bath techniques. Once applied, openings must be made in the solder mask wherever components are soldered, which is accomplished using photolithography.[1] Solder mask is traditionally green but is now available in many colors.

Solder mask comes in different media depending upon the demands of the application. The lowest-cost solder mask is epoxy liquid that is silkscreened through the pattern onto the PCB. Other types are the liquid photoimageable solder mask (LPSM) inks and dry film photoimageable solder mask (DFSM). LPSM can be silkscreened or sprayed on the PCB, exposed to the pattern and developed to provide openings in the pattern for parts to be soldered to the copper pads. DFSM is vacuum laminated on the PCB then exposed and developed. All three processes go through a thermal cure of some type after the pattern is defined.

In electronic design automation, the solder mask is treated as a layer of the printed circuit board, and is described as a Gerber file like any other layer, such as the copper and silkscreen layers.[2]

External links

  • Soldermask: it's not just green anymore whether it's to identify revision changes or to look trendy in a see-through box, soldermask is taking on a rainbow of colors. But your processes will have to change with the hues. - Free Online Library

References

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