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Space Research and Technology Institute

 

Space Research and Technology Institute

Bulgarian Space Research Institute
Институт за космически изследвания и технологии
Owner  Bulgaria
Established 1987
Headquarters Sofia, Bulgaria
Website www.space.bas.bg

The Space Research and Technology Institute (Bulgarian: Институт за космически изследвания и технологии) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is one of the primary research bodies in the field of space science in Bulgaria.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Scope 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

History

The organized participation of Bulgarian scientists in space research started in 1969 with the creation of a Scientific Group of Space Physics (SGSP) at the Presidium of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences.[1] In 1974, based on the SGSP, the Central Laboratory for Space Research (CLSR) was founded. Bulgarian scientists successfully participated in the Soyuz 33. In 1981 two satellites were launched - Bulgaria 1300 and Meteor-Priroda 2-4 (Meteor 1-31), furnished entirely with Bulgarian equipment, aimed at studying the ionospheric-magnetospheric relationship and remote sensing of the Earth from space. In 1988 the second Bulgarian cosmonaut Alexandar Alexsandrov flew on board Soyuz TM-5 to the Mir space station.

The Space Research and Technology Institute (SRTI) at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences succeeded the Central Laboratory for Space Research in 1987.

Scope

The field of activity of SRTI ranges over fundamental and applied investigations in space physics, astrophysics, image processing, remote sensing, life sciences, scientific equipment, preparation and implementation of experiments in the area of space exploration and usage from the board of automatic and piloted spacecraft, investigation on control systems, air- and spacecraft and equipment for them, activity for creation of cosmic materials and technologies and their transfer in the national economy, education of post-graduate students and master degrees.

See also

References

  1. ^ Kutiev, I., Bulgarian Geophysical Journal, 2008, Vol. 34, p. 55, [1] (in Bulgarian)
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