World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Sponge (tool)

Article Id: WHEBN0022328243
Reproduction Date:

Title: Sponge (tool)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Generic character (fiction), 5-in-1 ration, Filter (aquarium), Sponge diving
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Sponge (tool)

Sponges

A sponge is a tool or cleaning aid consisting of porous material. Sponges are usually used for cleaning impervious surfaces. They are especially good at absorbing water and water-based solutions.

Sponges are commonly made from cellulose wood fibers or foamed plastic polymers. Some natural sponges are still sold, but most are now used either as body or facial sponges (bath sponges) or as tools for sponge painting.

The three other categories of available synthetic sponges are: low-density polyether (known as the rainbow packs of non-absorbent sponges), PVA (very dense, highly absorbent material with no visible pores), and polyester.

Polyester sponges are subdivided into a variety of types, some of which are reticulated (artificially broken-in) for ease of use. One type, double-blown polyester, has high water-retention ability approaching or equaling that of PVA sponges, but with visible pores and more diverse uses.

Harboring bacteria

Cellulose sponges (because they are primarily made of wood fiber) can be a medium for the growth of harmful bacteria or fungi, especially when the sponge is allowed to remain wet between uses. Research at the University of Florida has found that if a wet sponge is heated in a microwave for two minutes most bacteria will be killed.

Gallery

See also

References

External links

sv:Svamp (redskap)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.