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St. Marys, Ohio

St. Marys, Ohio
City
Official seal of St. Marys, Ohio
Seal
Nickname(s): Rider Town
Motto: Where living is a pleasure
Location in Ohio
Location in Ohio
Location of St. Marys in Auglaize County
Location of St. Marys in Auglaize County
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Ohio
County Auglaize
incorporated 1834
Government
 • Mayor Patrick McGowan
 • Director of Public Service and Safety Gregory J. Foxhoven
Area[1]
 • Total 4.62 sq mi (11.97 km2)
 • Land 4.59 sq mi (11.89 km2)
 • Water 0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation 866 ft (264 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 8,332
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 8,272
 • Density 1,815.3/sq mi (700.9/km2)
  census
Time zone EST (UTC-4)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45885
Area code(s) 419
FIPS code 39-69680[4]
GNIS feature ID 1070921[5]
Website www.cityofstmarys.net

St. Marys is a city in Auglaize County, Ohio, United States. The population was 8,332 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Wapakoneta, Ohio, Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Education 3
  • Demographics 4
    • 2010 census 4.1
    • 2000 census 4.2
  • Sister cities 5
  • Notable people 6
  • Gallery 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

History

St. Marys has gone by a variety of names, the first of which was the name of a Native American village on the same location—Kettletown.

Formerly known as "Fort Barbee" and "Girty's Town", St. Marys was the Wapakoneta for the position as county seat but was ultimately unsuccessful in a controversial countywide election.[6]

Three properties in St. Marys are listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the former Fountain Hotel,[7] the Dr. Issac Elmer Williams House and Office,[7] and the former Holy Rosary Catholic Church, which was destroyed one year before it was placed on the Register.[7][8]

Geography

St Marys is located at (40.544256, -84.390060).[9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.62 square miles (11.97 km2), of which 4.59 square miles (11.89 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[1]

Education

Saint Marys is home to Memorial High School. It is also home to Grand Lake Christian Academy.

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 8,332 people, 3,283 households, and 2,194 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,815.3 inhabitants per square mile (700.9/km2). There were 3,620 housing units at an average density of 788.7 per square mile (304.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.4% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.3% of the population.

There were 3,283 households, of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.2% were non-families. 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.08.

The median age in the city was 37.5 years. 26.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25% were from 25 to 44; 25.4% were from 45 to 64; and 14.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.2% male and 50.8% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 8,342[18] people, 3,218 households, and 2,240 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,926.7 people per square mile (743.8/km²). There were 3,479 housing units at an average density of 803.5 per square mile (310.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.49% White, 0.35% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.98% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.14% from other races, and 0.88% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.46% of the population.

There were 3,218 households out of which 35.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.4% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $38,673, and the median income for a family was $44,247. Males had a median income of $38,371 versus $22,080 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,682. About 5.7% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.8% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over.

Sister cities

St. Marys has two sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:

Notable people

  • Douglas Fleagle, U.S. Army veteran and served during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Fleagle was awarded the Purple Heart Award due to injuries sustained while serving in Iraq.[20]
  • Johann August Ernst von Willich was a military officer in the Prussian Army and a leading early proponent of communism in Germany. In 1847 he discarded his title of nobility. He later immigrated to the United States and became a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He is buried in Elmgrove Cemetery.[21]

Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ a b c "American FactFinder".  
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  6. ^ http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/FH9&CISOPTR=38590&REC=8 Auglaize County, Ohio Atlas and History, Piqua: Magee Brother Publishing, 1917. Accessed 5 July 2007. Page 104.
  7. ^ a b c "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places.  
  8. ^ Shuffelton, Frank B. "Holy Rosary Catholic Church". Auglaize County Historical Society, ed. A History of Auglaize County Ohio. Defiance: Hubbard, 1980, 211-212.
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties" (PDF). Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Population: Ohio" (PDF). 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio" (PDF). 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  16. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  17. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  18. ^ Census Bureau Fact Sheet for Saint Marys OH
  19. ^ Galen Cisco at SABR Baseball Biography Project
  20. ^ [2]
  21. ^ August Willich

External links

  • City website
  •  
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