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Steve Denton

Steve Denton
Country (sports)  United States
Residence College Station, Texas, USA
Born (1956-09-05) September 5, 1956
Kingsville, Texas, USA
Height 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in)
Turned pro 1978
Retired 1987
Plays Right-handed (one-handed backhand)
College University of Texas
Prize money $1,084,664
Singles
Career record 108–117 (Grand Prix, WCT and Grand Slam level, and Davis Cup)
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 12 (April 18, 1983)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open F (1981, 1982)
French Open 1R (1982, 1984)
Wimbledon 4R (1982)
US Open 4R (1982)
Other tournaments
Tour Finals 1R (1982)
WCT Finals QF (1983)
Doubles
Career record 325–198 (Grand Prix, WCT and Grand Slam level, and Davis Cup)
Career titles 18
Highest ranking No. 2 (August 15, 1983)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open F (1983)
French Open QF (1984)
Wimbledon SF (1982, 1983)
US Open W (1982)
Other doubles tournaments
Tour Finals F (1982)

Steve Denton (born September 5, 1956, in Kingsville, Texas) is a former professional tennis player for the ATP Tour. He is currently the head men's tennis coach at Texas A&M University.

After becoming an all-American at the University of Texas in 1978, Denton spent nine seasons playing for the ATP Tour. He reached the final of both the 1981 and 1982 Australian Open, and won the 1982 US Open doubles championship with Kevin Curren, attaining career-high rankings of World No. 12 in singles and World No. 2 in doubles. He won a total of 18 tour level doubles titles and, despite reaching 6 finals, never won a singles title. In 1984, his 138 miles per hour (222 km/h) serve broke the world record, which would not be broken until 13 years later. After retiring from the pros, he moved to Corpus Christi, Texas, coaching several local junior tennis teams. In 2001, he debuted his college coaching career at Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi, where he led his teams to three conference championships and a first-ever NCAA tournament appearance. In 2006, he resigned to become the head coach at Texas A&M University.

For his accomplishments, he is a member of the ITA Hall of Fame, the Texas Tennis Hall of Fame, the Blue-Gray Tennis Class Hall of Fame, and the Longhorn Hall of Honor.

Contents

  • Playing career 1
    • High school and college 1.1
    • Professional 1.2
  • Grand Slam Finals, 7 2
    • Singles, 2 (2 finals) 2.1
    • Men's Doubles, 2 (1 win, 1 loss) 2.2
    • Mixed Doubles, 3 (3 finals) 2.3
  • Titles and Finals 3
    • Doubles titles (18) 3.1
    • Singles runner-ups (6) 3.2
  • Coaching career 4
    • Coaching record 4.1
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Playing career

High school and college

Denton attended Bishop High School in Bishop, Texas. As a prep, he won four consecutive UIL state 3A singles titles. He then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where he played tennis from 1976–79. He earned all-American honors in 1978. Along with teammate Kevin Curren, he won the U.S. Tennis Association amateur indoor and SWC doubles title in 1979. He completed his college career with an 85–22 singles record, which currently ranks third all-time in school history. He also compiled a 72–18 doubles record, and a 78–27 team record. For his collegiate and professional accomplishments, he was inducted into the Longhorn Hall of Honor in 2006.[1]

Professional

Denton was ranked as high as World No. 12 on the ATP Rankings in singles and No. 2 in doubles, both in 1983. Denton was known for his big serve and employed an unusual service motion which involved taking two steps forward prior to striking the ball. Current ATP rules prohibit such a motion (or any service motion involving a running or walking start). In 1984, Denton set a service record of 138 mph (222 km/h) that would stand for 13 years until it was broken in 1997 by Mark Philippoussis who recorded a 142 mph (229 km/h) delivery. The current record of 163 mph (262 km/h) is held by Sam Groth.

He reached six singles finals, most notably the Australian Open (in 1981 and 1982) and the Cincinnati Masters (in 1982). He also won 18 doubles titles (including the US Open and the Canada Masters) in 1982, and reaching 23 additional doubles finals.

Grand Slam Finals, 7

Singles, 2 (2 finals)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-Up 1981 Australian Open Grass Johan Kriek 6–2, 7–6, 6–7, 6–4
Runner-Up 1982 Australian Open (2) Grass Johan Kriek 6–3, 6–3, 6–2

Men's Doubles, 2 (1 win, 1 loss)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1982 US Open Grass Kevin Curren Victor Amaya
Hank Pfister
6–2, 6–7, 5–7, 6–2, 6–4
Runner-Up 1983 Australian Open Grass Sherwood Stewart Mark Edmondson
Paul McNamee
6–3, 7–6

Mixed Doubles, 3 (3 finals)

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-Up 1983 Wimbledon Grass Billie Jean King John Lloyd
Wendy Turnbull
6–7, 7–6, 7–5
Runner-Up 1983 US Open Grass JoAnne Russell Anne Smith
Kevin Curren
6–4, 7–6
Runner-Up 1984 Wimbledon (2) Grass Kathy Jordan John Lloyd
Wendy Turnbull
6–3, 6–3

Titles and Finals

Doubles titles (18)

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. 1979 Hong Kong Carpet Jeff Turpin Pat Du Pré
Robert Lutz
3–6, 4–6
Winner 1. 1980 Denver, U.S. Carpet Kevin Curren Wojtek Fibak
Heinz Günthardt
7–5, 6–2
Runner-up 2. 1980 Washington-2, U.S. Carpet Kevin Curren Ferdi Taygan
Brian Teacher
6–4, 3–6, 6–7
Runner-up 3. 1980 North Conway, U.S. Clay Kevin Curren Jimmy Connors
Brian Gottfried
6–7, 2–6
Winner 2. 1980 Indianapolis, U.S. Clay Kevin Curren Wojtek Fibak
Ivan Lendl
3–6, 7–6, 6–4
Winner 3. 1980 Barcelona, Spain Clay Ivan Lendl Pavel Složil
Balázs Taróczy
6–2, 6–7, 6–3
Winner 4. 1980 Basel, Switzerland Hard (i) Kevin Curren Bob Hewitt
Frew McMillan
6–7, 6–4, 6–4
Runner-up 4. 1980 Bologna, Italy Carpet Paul McNamee Balázs Taróczy
Butch Walts
6–2, 3–6, 0–6
Winner 5. 1981 Monterrey WCT, Mexico Carpet Kevin Curren Johan Kriek
Russell Simpson
7–6, 6–3
Runner-up 5. 1981 Brussels, Belgium Carpet Kevin Curren Sandy Mayer
Frew McMillan
6–4, 3–6, 3–6
Runner-up 6. 1981 London/Queen's Club, England Grass Kevin Curren Pat Du Pré
Brian Teacher
6–3, 6–7, 9–11
Winner 6. 1981 Indianapolis, U.S. Clay Kevin Curren Raúl Ramírez
Van Winitsky
6–3, 5–7, 7–5
Winner 7. 1981 Vienna, Austria Hard (i) Tim Wilkison Sammy Giammalva, Jr.
Fred McNair
4–6, 6–3, 6–4
Winner 8. 1981 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) Kevin Curren Sherwood Stewart
Ferdi Taygan
6–7, 6–4, 6–0
Runner-up 7. 1982 Masters Doubles WCT, London Carpet Kevin Curren Heinz Günthardt
Balázs Taróczy
7–6, 3–6, 5–7, 4–6
Winner 9. 1982 Denver, U.S. Carpet Kevin Curren Phil Dent
Kim Warwick
6–4, 6–4
Winner 10. 1982 Memphis, U.S. Carpet Kevin Curren Peter Fleming
John McEnroe
7–6, 4–6, 6–2
Runner-up 8. 1982 Munich-2 WCT, Germany Carpet Kevin Curren Mark Edmondson
Tomáš Šmíd
6–4, 5–7, 2–6
Winner 11. 1982 Frankfurt, Germany Carpet Mark Edmondson Tony Giammalva
Tim Mayotte
6–7, 6–3, 6–3
Winner 12. 1982 Houston, U.S. Clay Kevin Curren Mark Edmondson
Peter McNamara
7–5, 6–4
Winner 13. 1982 Toronto, Canada Hard Kevin Curren Peter Fleming
John McEnroe
6–7, 7–5, 6–2
Runner-up 9. 1982 Cincinnati, U.S. Hard Mark Edmondson Peter Fleming
John McEnroe
2–6, 3–6
Winner 14. 1982 US Open, New York Hard Kevin Curren Victor Amaya
Hank Pfister
6–2, 6–7, 5–7, 6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 10. 1982 Sydney Indoor, Australia Hard (i) Mark Edmondson John McEnroe
Peter Rennert
3–6, 6–7
Winner 15. 1983 Philadelphia, U.S. Carpet Kevin Curren Peter Fleming
John McEnroe
6–4, 7–6
Winner 16. 1983 Munich WCT, Germany Carpet Kevin Curren Heinz Günthardt
Balázs Taróczy
7–5, 2–6, 6–1
Winner 17. 1983 Houston WCT, U.S. Clay Kevin Curren Mark Dickson
Tomáš Šmíd
7–6, 6–7, 6–1
Winner 18. 1983 Las Vegas, U.S. Hard Kevin Curren Tracy Delatte
Johan Kriek
6–3, 7–5
Runner-up 11. 1983 Forest Hills WCT, U.S. Clay Kevin Curren Tracy Delatte
Johan Kriek
7–6, 5–7, 3–6
Runner-up 12. 1983 London/Queen's Club, England Grass Kevin Curren Brian Gottfried
Paul McNamee
4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 13. 1983 Dallas, U.S. Hard Sherwood Stewart Nduka Odizor
Van Winitsky
3–6, 5–7
Runner-up 14. 1983 Tokyo Indoor, Japan Carpet John Fitzgerald Mark Edmondson
Sherwood Stewart
1–6, 4–6
Runner-up 15. 1983 Wembley, England Carpet Sherwood Stewart Peter Fleming
John McEnroe
3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 16. 1983 Australian Open, Melbourne Grass Sherwood Stewart Mark Edmondson
Paul McNamee
3–6, 6–7
Runner-up 17. 1984 Richmond WCT, U.S. Carpet Kevin Curren John McEnroe
Patrick McEnroe
6–7, 2–6
Runner-up 18. 1984 Brussels, Belgium Carpet Kevin Curren Tim Gullikson
Tom Gullikson
4–6, 7–6, 6–7
Runner-up 19. 1984 Milan, Italy Carpet Kevin Curren Pavel Složil
Tomáš Šmíd
4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 20. 1985 Memphis, U.S. Carpet Kevin Curren Pavel Složil
Tomáš Šmíd
6–1, 3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 21. 1985 Atlanta, U.S. Carpet Tomáš Šmíd Paul Annacone
Christo van Rensburg
4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 22. 1987 Cincinnati, U.S. Hard John Fitzgerald Ken Flach
Robert Seguso
5–7, 3–6
Runner-up 23. 1988 Tokyo Outdoor, Japan Hard David Pate John Fitzgerald
Johan Kriek
4–6, 7–6, 4–6

Singles runner-ups (6)

Outcome No. Date Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. 1981 Australian Open, Melbourne Grass Johan Kriek 2–6, 6–7, 7–6, 4–6
Runner-up 2. 1982 Metz, France Hard (i) Erick Iskersky 4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 3. 1982 Cincinnati, U.S. Hard Ivan Lendl 2–6, 6–7
Runner-up 4. 1982 Australian Open, Melbourne Grass Johan Kriek 3–6, 3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 5. 1983 Richmond WCT, U.S. Carpet Guillermo Vilas 3–6, 5–7, 4–6
Runner-up 6. 1984 Richmond WCT, U.S. Carpet John McEnroe 3–6, 6–7

Coaching career

Denton made his first head coaching debut at Texas A&M–Corpus Christi in 2001. In his five seasons there, he led the Islanders to three Southland Conference regular-season championships, two tournament championships, and the team's first-ever NCAA Tournament appearance. He was named Southland Conference Coach of the Year twice, in 2004 and 2005. He finished with a 64–48 overall record.[2]

On August 8, 2006, Denton became the head men's tennis coach at Texas A&M University. After struggling for two years in Big 12 Conference play, Denton led the Aggies to a 5-1 conference record and 2nd place finish in his third year, earning Big 12 Coach of the Year honors.[3]

Coaching record

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Texas A&M–Corpus Christi Islanders (Southland Conference) (2001–2006)
2001–2002 Texas A&M–Corpus Christi 8–12
2002–2003 Texas A&M–Corpus Christi 13–9
2003–2004 Texas A&M–Corpus Christi 14–7 1st
2004–2005 Texas A&M–Corpus Christi 19–8 6–0 1st NCAA Second Round
2005–2006 Texas A&M–Corpus Christi 10–12 5–1 1st
Texas A&M–Corpus Christi: 64–48
Texas A&M Aggies (Big 12 Conference) (2006–present)
2006–2007 Texas A&M 15–12 1–5 7th NCAA Second Round
2007–2008 Texas A&M 13–12 2–4 5th NCAA Second Round
2008–2009 Texas A&M 17–9 5–1 2nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2009–2010 Texas A&M 25–7 5–1 2nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2010–2011 Texas A&M 29–6 5–1 2nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen
Texas A&M: 99–46 18–12
Total: 163–94

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References

  1. ^ "Steve Denton". Texas Longhorns Athletics. Retrieved March 22, 2008. 
  2. ^ "A&M's Denton Selected to 2008 ITA Hall of Fame Class". Big 12 Sports. Archived from the original on May 11, 2008. Retrieved March 21, 2008. 
  3. ^ "Denton, Pollock and Krajicek Earn Big 12 Conference Honors". AggieAthletics.com. Retrieved May 7, 2009. 

External links

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