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Studebaker Avanti

 

Studebaker Avanti

See also Avanti cars (non-Studebaker)

The Studebaker Avanti was a personal luxury coupe built by the Studebaker Corporation between June 1962 and December 1963. Studebaker itself referred to the Avanti as "America's Only 4 Passenger High-Performance Personal Car!" in its sales literature.[4] The Avanti was developed at the direction of tt error

See also Avanti cars (non-Studebaker)''''''''''''''

The Studebaker Avanti was a personal luxury coupe built by the Studebaker Corporation between June 1962 and December 1963. Studebaker itself referred to the Avanti as "America's Only 4 Passenger High-Performance Personal Car!" in its sales literature.[10] The Avanti was developed at the direction of the automaker's president, Sherwood Egbert.

Design

Rear view of an Avanti

"The car's design theme is the result of sketches Sherwood Egbert "doodled" on a jet-plane flight west from Chicago 37 days after becoming president of Studebaker in February 1961."[1] Designed by Raymond Loewy's team of Tom Kellogg, Bob Andrews and John Ebstein on a 40-day crash program, the Avanti featured a radical fiberglass body design mounted on a modified Studebaker Lark Daytona 109-inch convertible chassis with a modified 289 Hawk engine. It was one of the first Bottom breather designs where instead of a conventional grille, air for the front mounted engine enters from under the front of the vehicle, a design feature much more common after the 1980s. The car was fitted with front disc-brakes which were British Dunlop designed units, made under license by Bendix,[14] "the first American production model to offer them." A the to manufacture l numbers of = The Av nti name, tool ng and | ace wer s ld t| South Be| ]], |er|s,|ltman and|Newman,{{full|date|te|y | th first of a su ces ion of en re ren urs o manuf ct re small umbers of [[Avanti cars non-S udebake )|Acars Studebaker)er)|Avanti replica and new design cars through 2006. The car had a rare combination of safety designed into it, with blazing fast speed. 29 records were broken by it at the Bonneville Salt Flats.[18] The original Studebaker Avanti has been described as "one of the more significant milestones of the postwar industry".[28]:p257

References

  1. ^

External links

  • Avanti Owners Association International homepage
  • The Studebaker Drivers Club homepage
  • The Unlikely Studebaker: Raymond Loewy and the Birth (and Rebirth) of the Avanti
  • Photos of defunct Avanti Motor Corporation, South Bend, in the 1980s
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