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Tabs of the United States Army

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Tabs of the United States Army

In the United States Army, "tabs" are small cloth and/or metal arches displaying a word or words signifying a special skill that are worn on U.S. Army uniforms. On the Army Combat Uniform, the tabs are worn above a unit's shoulder patch and are used to identify a unit's or a soldier's special skill(s) or are worn on shoulder patches as part of a unit's unique heritage. Individual tabs are also worn as small metal arches above or below medals or ribbons on the Army Service Uniform.

Tabs are valued uniquely in the U.S. Army because images rather than words are traditionally used for the symbolism of the shoulder patch worn to identify a soldier's unit. It is only to identify an individual soldier's or a whole unit's special skill that an additional shoulder patch is worn that uses words rather than images to symbolize this skill. For example, while any member of a special forces unit will wear the unit identifying patch that includes an arrowhead, sword, lightning, and Airborne Tab, only soldiers who have completed special forces training will have been awarded and wear an additional tab containing the words "SPECIAL FORCES" (i.e. the Special Forces Tab).

Some tabs are awarded to recognize an individual soldier's combat related skills or marksmanship and are worn by a soldier permanently. These tabs are also considered special skill badges and have metal equivalents that are worn on the soldier's chest if their uniform does not have a place for shoulder patches (e.g. the Army Service Uniform). Other tabs recognize a whole unit's special skill and are considered to be part of a specific unit's shoulder sleeve patch and are worn by a soldier only while they belong to that unit.[1] The Jungle Expert Tab is unique in that while it is awarded to recognize an individual soldier's skill, it is only worn by soldiers while they belong to certain units.[2] Similarly, tabs awarded at the state level by the US Army National Guard can only be worn by soldiers while they are on state-level orders.

Individual skill/marksmanship tabs

There are currently four permanent individual skill/marksmanship tabs authorized for wear by the U.S. Army. In order of seniority, they are the President's Hundred Tab, the Special Forces Tab, the Ranger Tab, and the Sapper Tab. Only three skill tabs may be worn at one time. As of 2012 there is one recorded individual who has earned all four skill/marksmanship tabs.

President's Hundred

President's Hundred Tab

The President's Hundred Tab is a marksmanship tab which is authorized for soldiers who qualify among the top 100 scoring competitors in the President's Match held annually at the National Rifle Matches at Camp Perry, Ohio. This is a permanent award which will stay with the individual, there is no annual requirement to maintain the President's Hundred Tab. Most competitors will compete each year to ensure that less qualified individuals do not receive the tab.[3]

On 27 May 1958, The National Rifle Association requested the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel's approval of a tab for presentation to each member of the "President's Hundred." NRA's plan was to award the cloth tab together with a metal tab during the 1958 National Matches. The cloth tab was of high level interest and approved for wear on the uniform on 3 March 1958.

The President's Hundred Tab is worn 1/2 inch below the shoulder seam on the left sleeve of the male and female Army green uniform coats. The tab is available in a subdued version for wear on the Battle Dress Uniform (BDUs). The tab is covered in paragraph 29-16c, AR 670-1 and paragraph 8-53, AR 600-8-22. A full-color embroidered tab of yellow 4¼ inches (10.80 cm) long and 5/8 inch (1.59 cm) high, with the word "President's Hundred" centered in 1/4 inch (.64 cm) high green letters. The metal replica is 2 inches (5.08 cm) wide.[4]

Special Forces

Special Forces Tab

The Special Forces Tab is a service school qualification tab of the United States Army, awarded to any soldier completing either the Special Forces Qualification Course, or the Special Forces Detachment Officer Qualification Course. Soldiers who are awarded the Special Forces Tab are authorized to wear it for the remainder of their military careers, even when not serving in a Special Forces command. The Special Forces Tab can be revoked by the Chain of Command, for example DUI, or misconduct as a Special Forces Soldier.

The Special Forces Tab was created in 1983 and is an embroidered quadrant patch worn on the upper left sleeve of a military uniform. The cloth tab is 3¼ inches wide and is teal blue with yellow embroidered letters.[5][6]

Ranger

Ranger Tab

The Ranger Tab is a qualification tab authorized upon completion of the U.S. Army's Ranger School by a member of the U.S. military, civilian personnel, or non-U.S. military personnel. The Ranger Tab was approved by the Chief of Staff, Army, on 30 October 1950. The Ranger Tab can be revoked IAW AR 600-8-22, Section 1-31, para. 13.

The full color tab is worn 1/2 inch below the shoulder seam on the left sleeve of the Army green coat. The subdued tab is worn 1/2 inch below the shoulder seam on the left sleeve of utility uniforms, field jackets and the desert battle dress uniform (DBDU). The full color tab is 2⅜ inches (6.03 cm) long, 11/16 inch (1.75 cm) wide, with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) yellow border and the word "RANGER" inscribed in yellow letters 5/16 inch (.79 cm) high. The subdued tab is identical, except the background is olive drab and the word "RANGER" is in black letters.[7]

Sapper

Sapper Tab

The Sapper Tab is a qualification tab which is authorized for graduates of the U.S. Army's Sapper School. The Sapper Tab was approved by the Chief of Staff, Army, on 28 June 2004. The Sapper tab can be rovoked by the Engineer Commanding Officer of Ft. Leonardwood, MO for misconduct, or not upholding the standard as an Engineer. Any requests will be processed thru USASC.[8][9]

The full color tab is worn 1/2 inch below the shoulder seam on the left sleeve of the Army green coat. The subdued tab is worn 1/2 inch below the shoulder seam on the left sleeve of utility uniforms, field jackets and the desert battle dress uniform (DBDU). The full color tab is 2⅜ inches (6.03 cm) long, 11/16 inch (1.75 cm) wide, with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) red border and the word "SAPPER" inscribed in white letters 5/16 inch (.79 cm) high. The woodland subdued tab is identical, except the background is olive drab and the word "SAPPER" is in black letters and the desert subdued tab has a khaki background with the word "SAPPER" in spice brown letters.[10]

National Guard - Governor's Twenty

Governor's Twenty Tab

The Governor's Twenty Tab is a state-level National Guard award, created in the late 1960s or early 1970s, that is usually awarded to the top 20 shooters in a state. However, award criteria vary from state-to-state. For example, within the Texas Military Forces, only eight Guardsmen are presented this award for rifle, eight for pistol, two for sniper, and two for machine gun each year. Texas Guardsmen compete against other National Guard Soldiers and Airmen who have already received the award; thus, there may be one or two new recipients of this award each year. In the Missouri National Guard, the top twelve Guardsmans selected to represent the Missouri National Guard at the Winston P. Wilson matches are awarded the tab. This tab is worn on the upper-left sleeve of the Army Combat Uniform below individual tabs and above unit and honor guard tabs. The Missouri National Guard also award a Governor's Twenty Ribbon that accompanies the tab which is worn on dress uniforms; any Guardsman who earns the award more than once wear Hawthorn Cluster Devices on top of the ribbon. Because this award is a state-level award, Soldiers in the Army National Guard under federal status (Title 10 of the U.S. Code) are not authorized to wear the award.[11][12][13][14][15][16]

Unit tabs

Airborne

The Airborne Tab is a part of the shoulder sleeve patch of U.S. Airborne units. Airborne forces are military units, usually light infantry, set up to be moved by aircraft and 'dropped' into battle. Thus they can be placed behind enemy lines, and have an ability to deploy almost anywhere with little warning. The tab is worn immediately above and touching the shoulder sleeve insignia. The tabs are 2½ inches (6.35 cm) long and 11/16 inch (1.75 cm) wide. The letters are 5/16 inch (.79 cm) high.[17]

Mountain

Mountain Tab

The Mountain Tab is a part of the shoulder sleeve Ranger School and each Special Forces Group maintain detachments that specialize in mountain warfare.

Honor Guard

Honor Guard Tab of selected units
ARNG Honor Guard Tab

The Honor Guard Tab is a part of the shoulder sleeve patch of the 3d US Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) and other specially selected units. The tab had been worn by the Honor Guard Company of the 1st Battle Group, 3d Infantry (The Old Guard) since early 1950. It was officially approved for wear by the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel (DCSPER) on 14 October 1959. On an ultramarine blue arc tab 3⅞ inches (9.84 cm) long and 11/16 inch (1.75 cm) high overall, the designation "HONOR GUARD" in white letters 5/16 inch (.79 cm) high. The subdued tab is identical, except the background is olive drab and the letters are in black.[18]

On 16 March 1965, the DCSPER approved a tab for wear by selected Honor Guards. Proposed designs were submitted on 26 March 1965. The DCSPER approved the above design on 19 April 1965. A subdued tab is also authorized.[19]

On 31 December 2012, the DCSPER approved another Honor Guard Tab for wear by select Army National Guard Honor Guard units. The new tab is an ultramarine blue embroidered tab with the inscription “ARNG HONOR GUARD” in goldenlight 5/16 inch (.79 cm) letters, edged with a 1/8 inch (.32 cm) goldenlight border.[20]

Obsolete and Unofficial

Former Jungle Expert Patch
Current Jungle Expert Tab

Several tabs are widely worn unofficially by members of the U.S. Army. Often these tabs were worn on the underside of pocket flaps so as not to violate uniform regulations. Such tabs also appear on stickers, shirts, hats, etc. that soldiers would wear with civilian attire. These include tabs containing the words "SNIPER", "AIR ASSAULT", "FISTER", "SCOUT", and "RECON" or "RECONDO." The "SAPPER" tab was one of these unofficial tabs until 2004 when it became an official special skill badge/tab of the U.S. Army.

The Jungle Expert Patch was often worn by graduates of the Jungle Operations Training Center (JOTC) until the school became inactive in 1999. The patch may have been authorized for wear by soldiers assigned to U.S. Army South who graduate from JOTC but the patch was never recognized Army wide; much like the quasi-official status the Cavalry Stetson enjoys today.

In 2014, the JOTC was reopened in Hawaii and the Jungle Expert Patch was revitalized as a tab which is authorized for wear by 25th Infantry Division soldiers who complete the course while soldiers assigned to other units receive the tab as a souvenir.[21][22]

See also

References

  1. ^ Pentagon.mil
  2. ^ USmedals.com
  3. ^ USCG.mil
  4. ^ Pentagon.mil
  5. ^ U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum: Special Forces Tab
  6. ^ Army Regulation 600-8-22, Section 8-49.
  7. ^ Pentagon.mil
  8. ^ Sapper leader course pamphlet section III, US Army
  9. ^ Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia US Army
  10. ^ Pentagon.mil
  11. ^ U.S. Army Regulation 670-1: Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, Official Department of the Army Publications and Forms, dated 3 Feb 05, last accessed 4 Oct 11
  12. ^ Tabs and Badges a Measure of Marksmanship, Missouri National Guard, dated 14 December 2010, last accessed 18 May 2014
  13. ^ National Guard Devices, by Eric Bush, last accessed 18 May 2014
  14. ^ Texas National Guard Marksmanship Program, Governor's Twenty, Texas National Guard, updated 4 Aug 11, last accessed 13 Nov 11
  15. ^ TXSG Team Wins First Place In 2009 Texas Adjutant General’s Combat Pistol Sustainment Exercise Competition, Texas State Guard, by Maj. J. Michael Spraggins, dated 7 May 07, last accessed 13 Nov 11
  16. ^ Governor's 20 Sniper Competition 2014, Texas Military Forces, dated 12 January 2014, last accessed 19 January 2014
  17. ^ The U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry
  18. ^ Honor Guard Tab for 1st Battalion, 3d Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry, accessed 6 Oct 2011
  19. ^ Honor Guard Tab for Selected Units, U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry, accessed 6 Oct 2011
  20. ^ Army National Guard Honor Guard Tab, U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry, last accessed 2 September 2013
  21. ^ JOTC graduates first jungle expert class since 1999, Hawaii Army Weekly, dated 4 April 2014, last accessed 1 May 2014
  22. ^ Soldiers earn tab and wear BDUs in tough new jungle course, ArmyTimes, dated 5 May 2014, last accessed 9 May 2014

External links

  • Army Regulation 600-8-22 paragraph 8-49: Special Forces Tab - official information.
  • Pentagon Institute of Heraldry's Sapper Tab Page
  • About.com Sapper Tab Article
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