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Texas's 32nd congressional district

 

Texas's 32nd congressional district

Texas's 32nd congressional district
Texas's 32nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Texas's 32nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Pete Sessions (RDallas)
Population (2000) 651,619
Median income $45,725
Ethnicity 67.6% White, 7.9% Black, 4.2% Asian, 36.2% Hispanic, 0.6% Native American, 0.6% other
Cook PVI R+10 (2012)

Texas's 32nd congressional district of the United States House of Representatives serves a suburban area of northeastern Dallas, Texas. The district was created after the 2000 census when Texas went from 30 seats to 32 seats. It was then modified in 2011 after the 2010 United States Census. The current representative is Pete Sessions.

Among other communities, the district includes part of the redistricting in 2011-2012,[1] the district now covers mostly the Northern and Eastern Dallas County areas, and a small portion of Collin County.

The 32nd district map at right, and several others in Texas, have been replaced by new maps for the 2012 election cycle. All current Texas congressional boundaries can be viewed interactively in detail at http://gis1.tlc.state.tx.us/.

Contents

  • List of representatives 1
  • Recent elections 2
    • 2004 election 2.1
    • 2006 election 2.2
    • 2008 election 2.3
    • 2010 election 2.4
    • 2012 election 2.5
  • Historical district boundaries 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

List of representatives

Representative Party Years Electoral history
District created January 3, 2003
Pete Sessions Republican January 3, 2003 –
Present
Redistricted from the 5th district

Recent elections

2004 election

In the Republican-leaning district.

US House election, 2004: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Pete Sessions 109,859 54.3 -14.8
Democratic Martin Frost 89,030 44.0 +13.7
Libertarian Michael Needleman 3,347 1.7 +0.6
Majority 20,829 10.3
Turnout 202,236
Republican hold Swing -14.2

2006 election

In 2006, Dallas lawyer (and cousin of Arkansas Senator Mark Pryor) Will Pryor unsuccessfully challenged Sessions, and lost by a large margin.

US House election, 2006: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Pete Sessions 71,461 56.4 +2.1
Democratic Will Pryor 52,269 41.3 -2.7
Libertarian John B. Hawley 2,922 2.3 +0.6
Majority 19,192 15.1 +4.8
Turnout 126,562 -75,584
Republican hold Swing +2.4

2008 election

In 2008, Sessions successfully faced a challenge by Democrat Eric Roberson and was reelected to another term.[2]

US House election, 2008: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Pete Sessions 116,165 57.2 +0.8
Democratic Eric Roberson 82,375 40.6 -0.7
Libertarian Alex Bischoff 4,410 2.2 -0.1
Majority 33,790 16.6 +1.5
Turnout 202,950 +76,298
Republican hold Swing +0.8

2010 election

In 2010, Sessions successfully faced a challenge by Democrat Grier Raggio and Libertarian John Jay Myers. Sessions was reelected to another term.[3]

US House election, 2010: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Pete Sessions 79,433 62.6 +5.4
Democratic Grier Raggio 44,258 34.9 -5.7
Libertarian John Jay Myers 3,178 2.5 +0.3

2012 election

In 2012, Sessions successfully faced a challenge by Democrat Katherine Savers McGovern and Libertarian Seth Hollist. Sessions was reelected to his 13th term.[4]

US House election, 2012: Texas District 32
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Pete Sessions 146,129 58.29 -4.31
Democratic Katherine Savers McGovern 98,867 39.44 +4.54
Libertarian Seth Hollist 5,664 2.25 -0.25

Historical district boundaries

2007 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ Ross Ramsey (March 5, 2012). "In Redistricting, Race is the Limit to GOP Majority". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  2. ^ US News and World Report (November 10, 2008). "2008 US Congressional Race Results". USA Today. Retrieved May 6, 2009. 
  3. ^ The New York Times (November 10, 2009). "Election 2010". The New York Times. Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  4. ^ Texas Office of the Secretary of State (November 9, 2012). "2012 General Election Results". Office of the Secretary of State. Retrieved Nov 29, 2012. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

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