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The Missing Rembrandt

The Missing Rembrandt
Directed by Leslie S. Hiscott
Produced by Julius Hagen
Written by Arthur Conan Doyle
H. Fowler Mear
Cyril Twyford
Starring Arthur Wontner
Jane Welsh
Miles Mander
Cinematography Sydney Blythe
Basil Emmott
Edited by Jack Harris
Distributed by Twickenham Studios
Release dates February 1932 (UK)
25 March 1932 (US)
Running time 84 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English

The Missing Rembrandt (1932) is a British mystery film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring Arthur Wontner, Jane Welsh, Miles Mander, and Francis L. Sullivan.[1] Sherlock Holmes goes on the trail of a Rembrandt painting, stolen by a drug-addicted artist. This film is considered a lost film. [2]

Contents

  • Cast 1
  • Critical reception 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Cast

Critical reception

The New York Times wrote, "another of Sir Arthur Conan Boyle's tales of the master detective, slightly changed as to action and entirely as to title, provides both excitement and laughter at the Strand. "The Missing Rembrandt," a British production...brings back a number of screen actors who by this time seem to be perfectly at home in their parts. The Sherlock Holmes of Arthur Wontner is the same ascetic-looking unraveler of mysterious crime; the Dr. Watson of Ian Fleming exclaims: "Marvelous, my dear Holmes," as he has in other pictures of the series; the Mrs. Hudson of Minnie Raynor is as plump and cockneyish as ever, and the Scotland Yard Inspector Lestrade of Philip Hewland is as unimaginative as the police official in question is meant to be." [3]

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Missing Rembrandt".  
  2. ^ "The Missing Rembrandt". 
  3. ^ "Movie Review - The Missing Rembrandt - Sherlock Holmes Again. - NYTimes.com". 

External links

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