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Thiabendazole

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Thiabendazole

Tiabendazole (INN, other names include TBZ, thiabendazole and the trade names Mintezol, Tresaderm, and Arbotect) is a fungicide and parasiticide.

Uses

Fungicide

It is used primarily to control mold, blight, and other fungally caused diseases in fruits (e.g. oranges) and vegetables; it is also used as a prophylactic treatment for Dutch elm disease.

Use in treatment of aspergillosis has been reported.[1]

Parasiticide

As an antiparasitic, it is able to control roundworms (such as those causing strongyloidiasis),[2] hookworms, and other helminth species which attack wild animals, livestock and humans.[3]

Angiogenesis Inhibitor

Genes responsible for the maintenance of cell walls in yeast have been shown to be responsible for angiogenesis in vertebrates. Tiabendazole serves to block angiogenesis in both frog embryos and human cells. It has also been shown to serve as a vascular disrupting agent to reduce newly established blood vessels. Tiabendazole has been shown to effectively do this in certain cancer cells [4]

Pharmacodynamics

TBZ works by inhibition of the mitochondrial, helminth-specific enzyme, fumarate reductase, with possible interaction with endogenous quinone.[5]

Other

Medicinally, thiabendazole is also a chelating agent, which means that it is used medicinally to bind metals in cases of metal poisoning, such as lead, mercury or antimony poisoning.

In dogs and cats, thiabendazole is used to treat ear infections.

Thiabendazole is also used as a food additive,[6][7] a preservative with E number E233 (INS number 233). For example, it is applied to bananas to ensure freshness, and is a common ingredient in the waxes applied to the skins of citrus fruits. It is not approved as a food additive in the EU,[8] Australia and New Zealand.[9]

Safety

The substance appears to have a slight toxicity in higher doses, with effects such as liver and intestinal disorders at high exposure in test animals (just below LD50 level). Some reproductive disorders and decreasing weaning weight have been observed, also at high exposure. Effects on humans from use as a drug include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, or headache; very rarely also ringing in the ears, vision changes, stomach pain, yellowing eyes and skin, dark urine, fever, fatigue, increased thirst and change in the amount of urine. Carcinogenic effects have been shown at higher doses.[10]

See also

References

  • Thiabendazole, Extension Toxicology Network
  • Medicinenet: Thiabendazole - Oral
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