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Thigh

 

Thigh

Thigh
Front and medial aspect of a male right thigh
Cross-section of the thigh showing muscles and bone (latin terminology).
Details
Latin femur
Anatomical terminology

In humans, the thigh is the area between the pelvis and the knee. Anatomically, it is part of the lower limb.[1]

The single bone in the thigh is called the femur. This bone is very thick and strong (due to the high proportion of cortical bone), and forms a ball and socket joint at the hip, and a condylar joint at the knee.

Contents

  • Structure 1
    • Bones 1.1
    • Muscular compartments 1.2
    • Blood supply 1.3
  • Clinical significance 2
  • Additional images 3
  • References 4

Structure

Bones

Overall, the leg (lower limb) consists of seven interior bones:

Muscular compartments

In cross-section, the thigh is divided up into three separate compartments, divided by fascia, each containing muscles. These compartments use the femur as an axis, and are separated by tough connective tissue membranes (or septa). Each of these compartments has its own blood and nerve supply, and contains a different group of muscles.

Anterior compartment muscles of the thigh include pectineus, sartorius, and the four muscles that comprise the quadriceps muscles- rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius and vastus lateralis.

Posterior compartment muscles of the thigh are the hamstring muscles, which include semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris.

Medial compartment muscles are adductor magnus, adductor longus and adductor brevis, and also gracilis.

Blood supply

The arterial supply is by the femoral artery and the obturator artery. The lymphatic drainage closely follows the arterial supply and drains to the lumbar lymphatic trunks on the corresponding side, which in turn drains to the cisterna chyli.

The deep venous system of the thigh consists of the femoral vein, the proximal part of the popliteal vein, and various smaller vessels; these are the site of proximal deep venous thrombosis. The venae perfortantes connect the deep and the superficial system, which consists of the saphenous veins (the site of varicose veins).

Clinical significance

Thigh weakness can result in a positive Gowers' sign on physical examination.

Additional images

References

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