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Third Sea Lord

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Third Sea Lord

The Third Sea Lord and Controller of the Navy was formerly the Naval Lord and member of the Board of Admiralty responsible for procurement and matériel in the British Royal Navy. The title of the office is now simply Controller of the Navy (abbreviated as CofN), and the Controller of the Navy is a member of the Admiralty Board.

Contents

  • History 1
  • List of Third Naval / Sea Lords and Controllers of the Navy 2
    • Controllers of the Navy up to 1832 2.1
    • Third Naval Lords 1830–1869 2.2
    • Controllers of the Navy 1859–1869 2.3
    • Third Naval Lords and Controllers of the Navy 1869–1872 2.4
    • Controllers of the Navy 1872–1882 2.5
    • Third Naval Lords and Controllers of the Navy 1882–1904 2.6
    • Third Sea Lord and Controllers of the Navy 1904–1912 2.7
    • Third Sea Lords 1912–1918 2.8
    • Controllers of the Navy 1917–1918 2.9
    • Third Sea Lords and Controllers of the Navy 1918–1965 2.10
    • Controllers of the Navy 1965–present 2.11
  • Footnotes 3
  • See also 4

History

In 1805, for the first time, specific functions were assigned to each of the 'Naval' Lords, who were described as 'Professional' Lords, leaving to the 'Civil' Lords the routine business of signing documents.[1]

In the reorganisation of the Admiralty by Order in Council of 14 January 1869, the Comptroller of the Navy was given a seat on the Board of Admiralty as the Third Naval Lord and Comptroller of the Navy. The Comptroller lost the title of Third Naval Lord and the seat on the Board by an Order in Council of 19 March 1872, but regained them by a further Order of 10 March 1882.[2]

In 1869, the post of Storekeeper-General of the Navy was abolished and its duties merged into those of the Comptroller of the Navy.[3] The Third Naval Lord became known as the Third Sea Lord from 1905.

The appointment of Controller of the Navy was abolished in September 1912, although that of Third Sea Lord remained.[4] In 1917 the post of Controller of the Navy was revived, but as a separate civilian position with a seat on the Board of Admiralty.[5] In 1918, the post of Controller of the Navy was once again amalgamated with that of Third Sea Lord and in 1965 the post became simply Controller of the Navy.[6]

List of Third Naval / Sea Lords and Controllers of the Navy

Controllers of the Navy up to 1832

In 1832 the post of Controller of the Navy was abolished.

Third Naval Lords 1830–1869

Controllers of the Navy 1859–1869

In 1859 the post of Surveyor of the Navy was changed to Controller of the Navy.

Third Naval Lords and Controllers of the Navy 1869–1872

Controllers of the Navy 1872–1882

Third Naval Lords and Controllers of the Navy 1882–1904

Third Naval Lords and Controllers of the Navy include:[7]

Third Sea Lord and Controllers of the Navy 1904–1912

Third Sea Lords 1912–1918

Controllers of the Navy 1917–1918

Third Sea Lords and Controllers of the Navy 1918–1965

Third Sea Lords and Controllers of the Navy include:[7]

Controllers of the Navy 1965–present

Controllers of the Navy include:[7]

Footnotes

  1. ^ (1975), pp. 18-31."Lord High Admiral and Commissioners of the Admiralty 1660-1870', Office-Holders in Modern Britain: Volume 4: Admiralty Officials 1660-1870"Sainty, JC, . Retrieved 4 September 2009. 
  2. ^ "The Board of Admiralty", The Times, 26 November 1900
  3. ^ "The Admiralty", The Times, 4 March 1869
  4. ^ "The Administration and Discipline of the Navy", The Times, 9 September 1912
  5. ^ "The Controller of the Navy", The Times, 28 May 1917
  6. ^ Whitaker's Almanack 1966
  7. ^ a b c Senior Royal Navy Appointments
  8. ^ Geddes was a civilian, but was granted Royal Navy rank while he served in this post.

See also

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