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Times Square (IRT 42nd Street Shuttle)

 

Times Square (IRT 42nd Street Shuttle)

"Times Square Station" redirects here. For other uses, see Times Square Station (disambiguation).
Times Square – 42nd Street
NYCS 1 NYCS 2 NYCS 3 Template:NYCS Flushing south NYCS N NYCS Q NYCS R 42nd Street Shuttle
New York City Subway rapid transit station complex
Entrance to the station at 42nd Street & 7th Avenue
Station statistics
Address West 42nd Street, Broadway & Seventh Avenue
New York, NY 10036
Borough Manhattan
Locale Times Square, Midtown Manhattan
Coordinates

40°45′22″N 73°59′13″W / 40.756°N 73.987°W / 40.756; -73.987Coordinates: 40°45′22″N 73°59′13″W / 40.756°N 73.987°W / 40.756; -73.987

Division A (IRT), B (BMT)
Line IRT 42nd Street Shuttle
      BMT Broadway Line
      IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line
      IRT Flushing Line
Services       1 all times (all times)
      2 all times (all times)
      3 all times (all times)
Template:NYCS Flushing south
      N all times (all times)
      Q all times (all times)
      R all except late nights (all except late nights)
      S all except late nights (all except late nights)
System transfers       IND Eighth Avenue Line (A all times C all except late nights E all times trains) at 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal
Connection

Levels 4
Other information
Opened June 3, 1917; 97 years ago (1917-06-03)[1]
Accessible 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal is also accessible)
Traffic
Passengers (2012)62,069,437 (complex)[2] Increase 2.4%
Rank 1 out of 421

Times Square – 42nd Street is a large station complex of the New York City Subway, located under Times Square at the intersection of 42nd Street, Seventh Avenue, and Broadway in Midtown Manhattan. When considered together with 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal, it is the busiest complex in the system, serving 62,069,437 passengers in 2012.[2]

The complex allows free transfers between the IRT 42nd Street Shuttle, the BMT Broadway Line, the IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line and the IRT Flushing Line, with a long transfer to the IND Eighth Avenue Line one block west at 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal. The complex is served by the:

  • 1, 2, 3, 7, N, and Q trains at all times
  • R trains and the 42nd Street Shuttle at all times except late nights
  • <7> trains during rush hours in the peak direction


IRT 42nd Street Shuttle platforms

Times Square
42nd Street Shuttle
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Railings along the Times Square Shuttle platform
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line IRT 42nd Street Shuttle
Services       S all except late nights (all except late nights)
Structure Underground
Platforms 3 side platforms (all connected at west end)
Tracks 3
Other information
Opened October 27, 1904; 109 years ago (1904-10-27)[3]
Former/other names 42nd Street
Station succession
Next north Tracks 1 and 3: (Terminal)
Track 4: 50th Street (no regular service)
Next south Grand Central: S all except late nights

In 1904, Times Square was originally a local station called 42nd Street on New York City's first subway. Three shuttle tracks have served it since 1918; the southbound express track was removed and replaced by a temporary wooden platform for access to the original northbound express track.

On both sides platforms are located (at the old local platforms) and where the southbound express track was; all three platforms connect on the west (railroad north) side. This walkway crosses the northbound local track on a bridge that can be lifted for the only access to that track, via a merge into the northbound IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line local track along the original subway alignment (north of the current Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line station). This track merge is only used for overnight swaps and special railfan excursion trains. The other three tracks once curved parallel to this.

Two of the three tracks end at bumper blocks at the west end of the platforms. Between the northbound local and the other tracks anywhere along the shuttle there is no track connection.

Because of the curvature on the platforms, gap fillers are used to bridge the gap between train and platform, however the gap fillers are not suitable for wheelchair passengers, making the shuttle platforms virtually inaccessible to wheelchairs, passengers who need service to Grand Central must use the IRT Flushing Line platforms. An underpass which used to connect the original side platforms lies between the downtown local track and the two express and the uptown local tracks of the BMT Broadway Line, which runs perpendicular to the shuttle.

Tracks 1 and 3 have gap fillers. Track 4 does not have gap fillers because of the convex curve of the platform. Track 4 can barely fit the three cars of the shuttle, so the last two doors of the train on the platform can only have one panel open for safety reasons. Track 3 can accommodate the most cars with four cars with space for a fifth.

Image gallery

Further reading


BMT Broadway Line platforms

Times Square – 42nd Street
NYCS N NYCS Q NYCS R
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Error creating thumbnail: File seems to be missing:
Uptown platform
Station statistics
Division B (BMT)
Line       BMT Broadway Line
Services       N all times (all times)
      Q all times (all times)
      R all except late nights (all except late nights)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened January 5, 1918; 96 years ago (1918-01-05)[4]
Accessible IRT Flushing Line platforms only)
Station succession
Next north 49th Street (local): N all times Q weekdays until 11:00 p.m. R all except late nights
57th Street – Seventh Avenue (express): Q late nights and weekends
Next south 34th Street – Herald Square: N all times Q all times R all except late nights


Next north south 34th Street – Herald Square: N all times Q all times R all except late nights

Times Square – 42nd Street is an express station on the BMT Broadway Line that has four tracks and two island platforms. The N and R trains stop on the outer local tracks. The Q train stops on the local track during weekdays when it operates to and from Queens, switching over to the express track south of this station. The Q stops on the center express tracks when it short turns at 57th Street – Seventh Avenue on nights and weekends. Connections to the other lines are at the northern end of the platforms. This station received a minor overhaul in the late 1970s when MTA fixed the station's structure and the overall appearance, and it repaired staircases and platform edges, removed pedestrian ramps, and replaced lighting. In 2004-2006, the station received a major overhaul and repairs, including upgrading the station for ADA compliance and restoring the original late 1910s tiling. MTA repaired the staircases, retiled the walls, added new tiling on the floors, upgraded the station's lights and the public address system, installed ADA yellow safety treads along the platform edge, and installed new signs and new trackbeds in both directions.

The express tracks north of the station spread out to pass around a crossunder in the Times Square shuttle platforms. This crossunder was sealed off in the 1960s.


On June 1, 1940, the title of the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation was transferred to the City of New York, signifying the first phase of unification of New York's subway system with the Independent Subway System as well as eventual public operation of the entire system. (The Interborough Rapid Transit Company would be merged on June 15 of the same year.) At midnight, a ceremony commemorating the transfer, with five hundred people in attendance, was held at the Times Square station. The last BMT train had left the 57th Street station five minutes earlier. When the train arrived at Times Square, BMT president William S. Menden handed over his company's properties to Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, who then gave them to New York City Board of Transportation chairman John H. Delaney. The Board of Transportation operated the New York City Transit System until the creation of the New York City Transit Authority in 1953.[5]


IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line platforms

Times Square – 42nd Street
NYCS 1 NYCS 2 NYCS 3
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Platform for the 1 train (right) and Express 2 and 3 trains (left)
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line       IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line
Services       1 all times (all times)
      2 all times (all times)
      3 all times (all times)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened June 3, 1917; 97 years ago (1917-06-03)[1]
Accessible IRT Flushing Line platforms only)
Station succession
Next north 50th Street (local): 1 all times 2 late nights
72nd Street (express): Template:NYCS Broadway-Seventh express
Next south 34th Street – Penn Station: 1 all times 2 all times 3 all except late nights
(Terminal): 3 late nights


Next north south 34th Street – Penn Station: 1 all times 2 all times 3 all except late nights
none: 3 late nights

Times Square – 42nd Street is an express station with four tracks and two island platforms. The outer tracks are served by the 1 local train, while the two inner tracks are served by the 2 and 3 express trains, the former of which runs local during late nights and uses the outer tracks. Access to the other lines is provided at the northern end and in the center of each platform. An elevator was recently installed and is now in operation but there are very few signs in the station complex that show where it is.

Just south of the station, a fifth center track begins, formed by a connection from each express track. This track splits back into the two express tracks just before 34th Street – Penn Station. This center track was used in the past for turning rush hour "Gap Trains", which would head back up to The Bronx rather than Lower Manhattan or Brooklyn. It is currently used for turning 3 trains, which terminate here during late nights.[6]

This section was the site of a 1928 wreck that killed 16 people, the second worst in New York City history (the worst being the Malbone Street Wreck in Brooklyn, which killed at least 93.)


IRT Flushing Line platform

Times Square
Template:NYCS Flushing south
New York City Subway rapid transit station
The IRT Flushing Line Platform
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line       IRT Flushing Line
Services Template:NYCS Flushing south
Structure Underground
Platforms 1 island platform
Tracks 2
Other information
Opened March 14, 1927; 87 years ago (1927-03-14)[7]
Accessible BMT Broadway Line platforms only)
Station succession
Next north Fifth Avenue: Template:NYCS Flushing south
Next south (Terminal): Template:NYCS Flushing south
34th Street: under construction
10th Avenue: Template:NYCS Second future


Next north south 34th Street: under construction
10th Avenue: Template:NYCS Second future

Times Square is the terminal for all 7 <7> service. It has one island platform between the two tracks located deep below West 41st Street. Stairs, escalators and an elevator along the platform lead to various mezzanines. There are "TS" tile mosaics along the station walls. An office is located at the north (compass east) end of the platform. An elevator was recently installed and connects with the Downtown IRT Seventh Avenue platform and then the mezzanine. The elevators make this platform along with the platforms at Grand Central accessible to wheelchair passengers, unlike the shuttle platforms which are not accessible to wheelchairs.

The tracks continue south (compass west) beyond the station to an unused storage and layover area. The extension of the Flushing Line, under construction as of April 2009, has work being done to improve this stretch. Third rails will be added, and the tracks inspected or replaced before they are opened to revenue service.[8] The closed lower level platform at 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal on the IND Eighth Avenue Line was blocking the line but has been removed.[9]


Template:NYCS Platform Layout Times Square Station

The complex

The IRT platforms have been connected to each other as a transfer station as the lines opened: first between the 42nd Street Shuttle and the Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line in 1918, then the transfer was incorporated with the Flushing Line in 1927. The free transfer between the IRT and BMT was added on July 1, 1948.[10] The block-long passageway that runs west to the 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line was opened within fare control on December 11, 1988. Since 1991, this passageway has contained a piece of public art inspired by the Burma-Shave ads; Norman B. Colp's The Commuter's Lament, or A Close Shave consists of a series of signs attached to the roof of the passageway, reading: File:Times Square station entrance vc.ogv

Overslept,
So tired.
If late,
Get fired.
Why bother?
Why the pain?
Just go home
Do it again.

with the last panel being a picture of a bed. The panels were part of an art project that was supposed to last only one year, but was never removed.[11]

This station underwent total reconstruction in stages starting in 1994. The reconstruction included a new entryway on the south side of 42nd Street between Seventh Avenue and Broadway, featuring a bright neon and colored glass flashing sign with the train route symbols and the word "Subway". The street level fare control at this site features restored original "Times Square" mosaics from the Contract I station walls (now used by the shuttle), and both escalators and stairs lead into the complex. There are also similar renovated entrances on the northwest and southwest corners of Seventh Avenue and 42nd Street, the latter of which has both escalators and stairs, while the former has only stairs.

In 1999, a US$44 million renovation of the complex began. The goal was to reduce congestion and improve rider access, comfort and safety by improving visual lines and increasing pedestrian capacity. The main corridor was widened 15 feet (4.6 m), and the number of sharp corners reduced; ADA accessibility was introduced with elevators; new escalators; and other corridors were widened. The mezzanine above the BMT Broadway Line, formerly a record shop, now features a large oval balcony looking over the trackway and has reduced the sense of claustrophobia described by many riders. In 2004, four unisex stall bathrooms were opened on the mezzanine between the IRT and BMT lines; they are staffed and maintained by employees of the Times Square Alliance, the local Business Improvement District. The record shop re-opened in 2007 on the south side of the IRT/BMT corridor.

The mezzanine has been a major featured spot for subway performers ever since the opening of the station. "Music Under New York" controls the spot, which is located by the escalators, opposite the shuttle to Grand Central. Musicians of all types, from musical saw to a brass band, perform there daily.

Relative depths

Artwork

George Lewis Heins and Christopher Grant Lafarge were the first commissioned architects of the IRT. They designed the original Times Square Station, which was located at the current Grand Central Shuttle stop.

In many of their stations, Heins and LaFarge use symbolic imagery to honor a neighborhood or its namesake. When Squire Vickers took over as chief designer and architect of the IRT in 1906, he continued this tradition of using symbolism to speak to a station's history.

The colored tile trim of the Times Square subway station bears an uncanny resemblance to the Confederate Battle Flag.[12] Scholars believe that Vickers, and his colleagues, unmistakably reference the symbol of the South to pay homage to New York Times owner Adolph S. Ochs.[13] The Confederacy was a significant part of Ochs' heritage, and the eccentric Vickers relished literary and historical imagery.[14] Times Square was named for the New York Times, whose headquarters, built by the Southerner Ochs, housed the original subway station in its basement.

Modern artwork installed in the complex includes the following:

  • New York in Transit by Jacob Lawrence, 2001
  • The Return of Spring/The Onset of Winter by Jack Beal, 2001/2005
  • Times Square Mural by Roy Lichtenstein, 2002 (collage 1990, fabricated 1994)
  • Times Square Times: 35 Times by Toby Buonagurio, 2005
  • The Revelers by Jane Dickson, 2008

New York in Transit was Lawrence's last public work before his 2000 death.[15] Lichtenstein completed Times Square Mural in 1994, but installation was delayed until after the station complex's renovation, during which Lichtenstein died in 1997.[16]

Foiled terrorist attack

Najibullah Zazi and alleged co-conspirators were arrested in September 2009 as part of an al-Qaeda Islamist plan to engage in suicide bombings on trains in the New York City subway system, including near the Times Square station, during rush hour that month, and Zazi has pled guilty.[17][18][19][20]

References

External links

  • NYCTA Subway Station Tour: 42nd Street - Port Authority / Times Square
  • Abandoned Stations - proposed Grand Central shuttle platform (includes a track diagram)
  • nycsubway.org — IRT Grand Central/Times Square Shuttle: Times Square
  • nycsubway.org — IRT Flushing Line: Times Square
  • nycsubway.org — IRT West Side Line: Times Square/42nd Street (text used with permission)
  • nycsubway.org — BMT Broadway Subway: Times Square/42nd Street
  • nycsubway.org — New York in Transit Artwork by Jacob Lawrence (2001)
  • nycsubway.org — Times Square Mural Artwork by Roy Lichtenstein (1994)
  • nycsubway.org — The Return of Spring/The Onset of Winter Artwork by Jack Beal (1999)
  • nycsubway.org — Times Square Times: 35 Times Artwork by Toby Buonagurio (2005)
  • nycsubway.org — The Revelers Artwork by Jane Dickson (2007)
  • Review and photos of the Times Square bathrooms at Gothamist (blog)
  • Forgotten NY — Original 28 - NYC's First 28 Subway Stations
  • MTA's Arts For Transit — Times Square – 42nd Street, Page 1
  • MTA's Arts For Transit — Times Square – 42nd Street, Page 2
  • MTA's Advertising Initiatives 9/21/2010 on the 42nd Street (S) Shuttle. Retrieved September 22, 2010. (2:13 video clip)
  • 42nd Street and Seventh Avenue entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • 42nd Street and Broadway entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • 43rd Street and Broadway entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • 41st Street and Seventh Avenue entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • 40th Street and Seventh Avenue entrance to IRT Lines from Google Maps Street View
  • 40th Street and Broadway entrance to Broadway Line and Shuttle from Google Maps Street View
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