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Top sirloin

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Title: Top sirloin  
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Subject: Plate steak, Blade steak, Ranch steak, Rump steak, Beef shank
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Top sirloin

Top sirloin steak
Top sirloin, middle and upper part of the sirloin but excluding the tenderloin.
Alternative names D-rump, boneless sirloin butt steak, top sirloin butt steak, dinner steak, finger steak
Type Beef steak
  Media: Top sirloin steak
Top sirloin steak - topped with an onion ring.

Top sirloin is a cut of meat from the primal loin, subprimal sirloin, of a beef carcass. Top sirloin steaks differ from sirloin steaks in that the bone and the tenderloin and bottom round muscles have been removed; the remaining major muscles are the gluteus medius and biceps femoris (top sirloin cap steak). Some American butchers call a thick top sirloin steak a chateaubriand, although the French reserve that term for a more premium cut from the tenderloin.

The USDA NAMP / IMPS codes related to this subprimal cut are 181A and 184. 181A is obtained from 181 after removing the bottom sirloin and the butt tender (the part of the tenderloin which is in the sirloin). 184 is obtained from 182 after removing the bottom sirloin. The foodservice cuts from 184 are 184A through 184F, its portion cut is 1184 and, the "subportion" cuts from 1184 are 1184A through 1184F. 181A is not further divided into foodservice cuts.[1]


Contents

  • Etymology 1
  • Cooking styles 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Etymology

The word comes from the Middle English surloine, which itself was derived from the Old French word surlonge, meaning sur la longe or above the loin.[2] In Modern French, the term evolved to become aloyau or faux-filet.[3]

An often quoted false etymology suggests that sirloin comes from the knighting by an English king (various kings are cited) of a piece of meat.[4] However, the English cut of Sirloin includes the large portion of beef which includes the short loin, top sirloin and bottom sirloin.

Cooking styles

Top sirloin steak is usually served grilled, broiled, sautéed, or pan-fried.

Alternatively, a top sirloin may be cut into slices thick enough to stand on their edge on the grill. In this case, the slices, typically seasoned only with coarse sea salt, are usually grilled with the thick layer of fat down until most of it melts away and the remaining fat becomes crispy. Each of the sides is then grilled for about ten seconds. The slices are then cut down the middle, each thus producing two slices only half as thick. The uncooked side of the new slices should then be grilled for a short time and are ready to be served.

See also

References

  1. ^ BEEF SERIES 100
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^

External links

  • Chart of beef cuts
  • Top sirloin description from Certified Angus Beef
  • Bovine myology & muscle profile


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