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Trans-European Transport Networks

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Trans-European Transport Networks

The Trans-European Transport Networks (TEN-T) are a planned set of road, rail, air and water transport networks in the European Union. The TEN-T networks are part of a wider system of Trans-European Networks (TENs), including a telecommunications network (eTEN) and a proposed energy network (TEN-E or Ten-Energy). The European Commission adopted the first action plans on trans-European networks in 1990.[1]

TEN-T envisages coordinated improvements to primary roads, railways, inland waterways, airports, seaports, inland ports and traffic management systems, providing integrated and intermodal long-distance, high-speed routes. A decision to adopt TEN-T was made by the European Parliament and Council in July 1996.[2] The EU works to promote the networks by a combination of leadership, coordination, issuance of guidelines and funding aspects of development.

These projects are technically and financially managed by the Trans-European Transport Network Executive Agency (TEN-T EA), which was established for this purpose by the European Commission in October 2006.

History

TEN-T guidelines were initially adopted on 23 July 1996, with Decision No 1692/96/EC[2] of the European Parliament and of the Council on Community guidelines for the development of the trans-European transport network.

In May 2001, the European Parliament and the Council adopted Decision No 1346/2001/EC,[3] which amended the TEN-T Guidelines with respect to seaports, inland ports and intermodal terminals.

In April 2004, the European Parliament and the Council adopted Decision No 884/2004/EC (added to the list by Decision No 884/2004/EC[4]), amending Decision No 1692/96/EC on Community guidelines for the development of the trans-European transport network. The April 2004 revision was a more fundamental change to TEN-T policies, intended to accommodate EU enlargement and consequent changes in traffic flows.[5]

Funding timeline

Financial support for the implementation of TEN-T guidelines stems from the following rules:

  • Regulation (EC) No 2236/95[6] of 18 September 1995 contains general rules for the granting of Community financial aid in the field of trans-European networks.
  • Regulation (EC) No 1655/1999[7] of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 July 1999 amends Regulation (EC) No 2236/95.
  • Regulation (EC) No 807/2004[8] of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 April 2004 amends Council Regulation (EC) No 2236/95.
  • Regulation (EC) No 680/2007[9] of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2007 supplies general rules for granting Community financial aid for trans-European transport and energy networks.

In general, TEN-T projects are mostly funded by national or state governments. Other funding sources include: European Community funds (ERDF, Cohesion Funds, TEN-T budget), loans from international financial institutions (e.g. the European Investment Bank), and private funding.

List of transport networks

Each transportation mode has a network. The networks are:[2]

Priority axes and projects

At its meeting in Essen in 1994, the European Council endorsed a list of 14 TEN-T ‘specific’ projects, drawn up by a group chaired by then Commission Vice-President Henning Christophersen.[1] Following the 2003 recommendations from the Van Miert TEN-T high-level group, the Commission compiled a list of 30 priority projects to be launched before 2010.[10]

The 30 axes and priority projects are:[11] A map showing the 30 projects, in PDF format, may be found here:

  1. Railway axis Berlin–Verona/Milan–Bologna–Naples–Messina–Palermo - map
  2. High-speed railway axis Paris–Brussels–Cologne–Amsterdam–London - map
  3. High-speed railway axis of south-west Europe - map
  4. High-speed railway axis east - map
  5. Betuwe line - map
  6. Railway axis Lyons–Trieste–Divača/ Koper–Divača–Ljubljana–Budapest–Ukrainian border - map
  7. Motorway axis Igoumenitsa/Patras–Athens–Sofia–Budapest - map
  8. Multimodal axis Portugal/Spain–rest of Europe - map
  9. Railway axis Cork–Dublin–Belfast–Stranraer - map
  10. Malpensa Airport - map
  11. Øresund Bridge - map
  12. Nordic triangle railway/road axis - map
  13. United Kingdom/Ireland/Benelux road axis - map
  14. West Coast Main Line - map
  15. Galileo - map
  16. Freight railway axis Sines/Algeciras-Madrid-Paris - map
  17. Railway axis Paris–Strasbourg–Stuttgart–Vienna–Bratislava - map
  18. Rhine/Meuse–Main–Danube inland waterway axis - map
  19. High-speed rail interoperability on the Iberian peninsula - map
  20. Fehmarn belt railway axis - map
  21. Motorways of the sea - map
  22. Railway axis Athens–Sofia–Budapest–Vienna–Prague– Nuremberg/Dresden - map
  23. Railway axis Gdansk–Warsaw–Brno/Bratislava–Vienna - map
  24. Railway axis Lyons/Genoa–Basle–Duisburg–Rotterdam/Antwerp - map
  25. Motorway axis Gdansk–Brno/Bratislava–Vienna - map
  26. Railway/road axis Ireland/United Kingdom/continental Europe - map
  27. Rail Baltica axis Warsaw–Kaunas–Riga–Tallinn–Helsinki - map
  28. Eurocaprail on the Brussels–Luxembourg–Strasbourg railway axis - map
  29. Railway axis of the Ionian/Adriatic intermodal corridor - map
  30. Inland waterway Seine–Scheldt -map

Related networks

In addition to the various TENs, there are ten Pan-European corridors, which are paths between major urban centres and ports, mainly in Eastern Europe, that have been identified as requiring major investment.

The international E-road network is a naming system for major roads in Europe managed by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. It numbers roads with a designation beginning with "E" (such as "E1").

See also

References

  1. ^ a b timeline of TEN-T priority axes and projects as of 2005, p. 7, PDF document, 14 MB
  2. ^ a b c Decision No 1692/96/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 July 1996 on Community guidelines for the development of the trans-European transport network
  3. ^ Decision No 1346/2001/EC
  4. ^ a b Decision No 884/2004/EC
  5. ^ here (13 MB)
  6. ^ Council Regulation (EC) No 2236/95 of 18 September 1995 laying down general rules for the granting of Community financial aid in the field of trans-European networks
  7. ^ Regulation (EC) No 1655/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 July 1999 amending Regulation (EC) No 2236/95 laying down general rules for the granting of Community financial aid in the field of trans-European networks
  8. ^ Regulation (EC) No 807/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 April 2004 amending Council Regulation (EC) No 2236/95 laying down general rules for the granting of Community financial aid in the field of trans-European networks
  9. ^ Regulation (EC) No 680/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2007 laying down general rules for the granting of Community financial aid in the field of the trans-European transport and energy networks
  10. ^ EC web site with links to the complete Van Miert reports, plus annexes and maps
  11. ^ detailed listing of all 30 TEN-T priority axes and projects as of 2005, with maps, PDF document, 14 MB

External links

  • Trans-European Transport Network Executive Agency
  • TEN-T Map (as of 2013)
  • Maps and Guidelines for TEN-T from the European Commission (as of 2012)
  • TEN-T - The Trans-European Transport Networks on the European Commission website
  • Map of the 30 priority axes and projects
  • Plans as of October 2013
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