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UFO sightings in New Zealand

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UFO sightings in New Zealand

This is a list of some of the more notable UFO reports in New Zealand. The most widely reported incident, and the only one investigated, involved the Kaikoura lights seen by a pilot in 1978. Although the New Zealand Defence Force does not take an official interest in UFO reports,[1] in December 2010 it released previously secret files on hundreds of purported UFO reports.[2] New Zealand's Minister of Defence, Wayne Mapp said people could "make what they will" of the reports, and said "a quick scan of the files indicates that virtually everything has a natural explanation".

1950s

  • In 1955 the captain of a National Airways Corporation aircraft reported seeing a light that showed apparent movement and changes in colour and intensity. The Director of Intelligence at the Carter Observatory concluded that it was Venus as it rose in the night sky.[3]
  • A Blenheim farmer claimed to have seen lights and a UFO containing two men in silvery suits in 1959.[3]

1970s

The 21 December 1978 incident in the Kaikoura area attracted media attention throughout New Zealand and Australia. The crew of a cargo plane reported strange lights over the Kaikoura Ranges and a Wellington radar team reported inexplicable readings.

See also

  • Bruce Cathie, a New Zealand author who has written about flying saucers

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ a b

Further reading

External links

  • UFOCUS NZ
  • New Zealand sightings at UFOINFO
  • Original files: New Zealands's UFO sightings


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