USS Seagull (MSC(O)-55)

For other ships of the same name, see USS Seagull.
Career (United States)
Name: USS YMS-402
Builder: Henry B. Nevins, Inc.
City Island, New York
Laid down: 24 July 1942
Launched: 17 April 1943
Commissioned: 26 June 1943
Decommissioned: 1 August 1946
In service: 30 October 1946, as Naval Reserve training ship
Renamed: USS Seagull (AMS-55), 1 September 1947
Namesake: the seagull bird
Recommissioned: 10 May 1950
Reclassified: MSC(O)-55, 7 February 1955
Decommissioned: 11 October 1957
Struck: 1 November 1959
Honors and
awards:
1 battle star, post World War II minesweeping
Fate: Sold; Ultimate fate unknown
General characteristics
Class & type: YMS-135 subclass of YMS-1-class minesweepers
Displacement: 320 (f.) tons
Length: 136 ft (41 m)
Beam: 24 ft 6 in (7.47 m)
Draft: 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Propulsion: 2 × 880 bhp General Motors 8-268A diesel engines
2 shafts
Speed: 13 knots (24 km/h)
Complement: 33
Armament: 1 × 3"/50 caliber gun mount
2 × 20 mm guns
2 × depth charge projectors

USS Seagull (MCS(O)-55/AMS-55/YMS-402) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II.

History

Seagull was laid down as YMS-402 on 24 July 1942 by Henry B. Nevins, Inc., City Island, New York; launched on 17 April 1943; and commissioned on 26 June 1943, Lt. (jg.) J.W. Gaines, USNR, in command.

In mid-August 1943, YMS-402 reported for duty in the Eastern Sea Frontier. For the next year, she operated out of the Naval Frontier Base, Tompkinsville, Staten Island, New York.

On 28 August 1944, she departed that base for San Diego, California, and duty in the central Pacific. Arriving at Eniwetok, Marshall Islands, on 20 November, the motor minesweeper, as a unit of Mine Squadron 102, remained in the Marshall-Gilberts force for the next nine months, conducting local minesweeping, escort, and patrol operations, and making an occasional escort into the Western Carolines. After the cessation of hostilities in the Pacific, she prepared for postwar minesweeping activities; and, at the end of August 1945, she sailed for Okinawa and Japan.

During the fall, she participated in the opening of Nagoya and Wakayama; and, with the new year, 1946, she headed back to the United States. After stops in the Marshalls and in the Hawaiian Islands, she arrived at San Pedro, California, in early April. She remained on the west coast into the summer; and, at the end of June, she sailed for New York, where she was decommissioned on 1 August 1946.

Placed in service again, YMS-402 departed New York on 30 October and moved north to the St. Lawrence, whence she proceeded to Buffalo, where she served as a naval reserve training ship until after the outbreak of war in Korea. Named USS Seagull and redesignated AMS-55 on 1 September 1947 and recommissioned on 10 May 1950, the former YMS returned to the Atlantic in September 1951 and took up training duties in the 5th Naval district. Initially based at Norfolk, Virginia, and then at the Mine Warfare School, Yorktown, Virginia.

She continued to operate out of the Hampton Roads/Virginia Capes area through 1954. Then, in 1955, Seagull, redesignated MSC(O)-55 on 7 February, was transferred to Charleston, South Carolina, whence, for the remainder of her career, she conducted operations which took her along the southeastern Atlantic seaboard, along the ‘gulf coast, and into the Caribbean as a unit of MinRon 4.

In mid-July 1957, the coastal minesweeper departed Charleston for Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned on 11 October and placed in reserve. Her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 November 1959.

Awards and honors

YMS-402 earned one battle star for her post-World War II minesweeping activities.

References

  • This article incorporates text from the here.

External links

  • Photo gallery of Seagull at NavSource Naval History


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.