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United Kingdom local elections, 1991

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United Kingdom local elections, 1991

Local elections were held in the United Kingdom in 1991. In terms of seats, the results were a setback for the governing Conservative Party, who were left with their lowest number of councillors since 1973 - though in terms of popular vote it was an improvement from the 1990 local elections (John Major had succeeded Margaret Thatcher as prime minister in November 1990), and the Conservatives would go on to win the general election in 1992.

Labour and the Liberal Democrats both benefitted from the Conservative losses.

The main opposition Labour Party gained 584 seats, bringing their number of councillors to 9,504 - their highest since 1975. Their projected share of the vote was 38%, a decline of 6% from the previous year. They overtook the Conservatives in number of councillors and would remain in that position until 2003.

The governing Conservative Party lost 1,035 seats, leaving them with 7,985 councillors. Their share of the vote was projected to be 35%, an increase of 2% from the previous year.

The Liberal Democrats gained 407 seats and had 3,672 councillors after the elections, a record number and a sign of their improving popularity after a series of disastrous performances in local and European elections after their formation in March 1988. Their projected share of the vote was 22%, up from 17% in 1990.[1]

References

  • http://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons/lib/research/rp2006/rp06-026.pdf
  1. ^ [1]
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