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United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2004

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United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2004

The 2004 congressional elections in Massachusetts was held on November 2, 2004, to determine who would represent the state of Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives. Massachusetts had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected were served in the 109th Congress from January 3, 2005 until January 3, 2007.

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Massachusetts, 2004[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Democratic 2,059,984 79.81% 10
Republican 435,239 16.86% 0
Independents 85,732 3.32% 0
Totals 2,580,955 100.00% 10

District 1

Incumbent Democratic Congressman John Olver ran for an eighth term in this staunchly Democratic[2] district rooted in western Massachusetts. Facing no opponents in the general election, Olver was overwhelmingly re-elected to another term.

Steven Adam ran as a write-in for the Republican nomination, but did not receive enough votes to make the general election ballot.[3]

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Olver (inc.) 229,465 99.02%
Write-ins 2,282 0.98%
Totals 231,747 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 2

This south-central Massachusetts-based district has a strong tendency to elect Democratic candidates,[2] and this year proved no different. When incumbent Democratic Congressman Richard Neal ran for a ninth term, he faced no opposition and coasted to re-election.

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard Neal (inc.) 217,682 98.73%
Write-ins 2,802 1.27%
Totals 220,484 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 3

Though incumbent Democratic Congressman Jim McGovern faced a challenge from Republican candidate Ronald Crews. This historically liberal district,[2] which stretches from the western suburbs of Boston to the Massachusetts-Rhode Island border, has sent Congressman McGovern back to Congress with overwhelming margins of victory.[4] This year proved to be no different, and McGovern crushed Crews to win a fifth term.
Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McGovern (inc.) 192,036 70.49%
Republican Ronald A. Crews 80,197 29.44%
Write-ins 179 0.07%
Totals 272,412 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 4

Congressman Barney Frank, a Democrat, has represented this strongly liberal[2] district, which extends from Quincy to the South Coast, since he was initially elected in 1980. In 2004, Congressman Frank faced a challenge from independent candidate Chuck Morse, whom he was able to defeat by a wide margin.

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barney Frank (inc.) 219,260 77.74%
Independent Charles A. Morse 62,293 22.09%
Write-ins 486 0.17%
Totals 282,039 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 5

This liberal[2] district rooted in the northern and eastern suburbs of Boston has been represented by Congressman Marty Meehan since he was first elected in 1992. This year, Congressman Meehan faced a challenge from Republican Thomas Tierney, but the Congressman won a seventh term.

Massachusetts's 5th congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marty Meehan (inc.) 179,652 66.99%
Republican Thomas P. Tierney 88,232 32.90%
Write-ins 305 0.11%
Totals 268,189 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 6

This district, which covers some of the northern suburbs of Boston and the far northeastern portion of the commonwealth, has been represented by Democratic Congressman John Tierney for eight years. In his quest for a fifth term, Tierney was opposed by Republican Stephen O'Malley, but he was re-elected in a landslide.
Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Tierney (inc.) 213,458 69.87%
Republican Stephen P. O’Malley, Jr. 91,567 29.98%
Write-ins 467 0.15%
Totals 305,522 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 7

Democratic Congressman Ed Markey, the longest serving member of the Massachusetts House members, has continually been re-elected with large margins in this staunchly liberal[2] district based in the northern and eastern suburbs of Boston. This year, Congressman Markey faced off against Republican Kenneth Chase, whom he crushed.

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Markey (inc.) 202,399 73.57%
Republican Kenneth Chase 60,334 21.93%
Independent James O. Hall 12,139 4.41%
Write-ins 227 0.08%
Totals 275,099 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 8

This congressional district, based in Boston and some of its southern suburbs, is the smallest district in Massachusetts and has been represented by Democratic Congressman Mike Capuano since 1999. Seeking a fourth term, Capuano faced no opposition and easily won the election.

Massachusetts's 8th congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Capuano (inc.) 165,852 98.67%
Write-ins 2,229 1.33%
Totals 168,081 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 9

Democratic Congressman Steven Lynch, a moderate Democrat,[5] has represented this district rooted in south Boston since he was first elected in 2001 in a special election to replace the late Congressman Joe Moakley. With a solidly liberal[2] constituency, Congressman Lynch encountered no opposition in his bid for a third term.

Massachusetts's 9th congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Stephen Lynch (inc.) 218,167 99.03%
Write-ins 2,145 0.97%
Totals 220,312 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 10

Opposed by Republican Michael Jones, incumbent Democratic Congressman Bill Delahunt sought a fifth term in this district based in the South Shore, Cape Cod and the Islands. Though more moderate[2] than the other districts in the commonwealth, the 10th district sent Congressman Delahunt back to Washington.

Massachusetts's 9th congressional district election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Delahunt (inc.) 222,013 65.87%
Republican Michael J. Jones 114,879 34.08%
Write-ins 178 0.05%
Totals 337,070 100.00%
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2004/2004Stat.htm#21
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 111th Congress." The Cook Political Report. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 June 2011. .
  3. ^ Massachusetts Election Statistics 2004. The Elections Division: Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
  4. ^ Jim McGovern#Electoral history
  5. ^ Koszczuk, Jackie; Angle, Martha (eds.) (2007). "Rep. Stephen F. Lynch (D)".  
Preceded by
2002 elections
United States House elections in Massachusetts
2004
Succeeded by
2006 elections


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