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United States Senate election in Vermont, 2010

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Title: United States Senate election in Vermont, 2010  
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United States Senate election in Vermont, 2010

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2010

November 2, 2010

 
Nominee Patrick Leahy Len Britton
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 151,281 72,699
Percentage 64.3% 30.9%

County results

U.S. Senator before election

Patrick Leahy
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Patrick Leahy[1]
Democratic

The 2010 United States Senate election in Vermont took place on November 2, 2010 alongside other elections to the United States Senate in other states as well as elections to the United States House of Representatives and various state and local elections. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy won re-election to a seventh term.

Democratic primary

Candidates

  • Patrick Leahy, incumbent U.S. Senator
  • Daniel Frielich, military doctor (also running as an independent)

Results

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Patrick Leahy 64,177 89.1%
Democratic Daniel Frielich 7,886 10.9%
Totals 72,063 100%

General election

Candidates

  • Len Britton (R), businessman
  • Patrick Leahy (D), incumbent U.S. Senator
  • Stephen Cain (I)[3]
  • Pete Diamondstone (Socialist)[3][4]
  • Cris Ericson (U.S. Marijuana), two-time former candidate for U.S. Senate[3]
  • Daniel Freilich (I), military doctor[3]
  • Johenry Nunes (I), military education and training manager[3]

Campaign

Leahy, first elected in 1974, is the first and only Democrat elected to Vermont. He won his last two re-election campaigns with at least 70% of the vote. He is the second-most-senior member of Congress. In a June 2010 poll, the incumbent was viewed very favorably by 52% of the state. It should be noted that 52% of the state opposed repeal of health care reform and 50% oppose Arizona's immigration law. Obama's approval rating in the poll was 62%.[5] Obama carried Vermont with 67% of the vote in 2008.

His Republican opponent, Len Britton, is a businessman who has never run for public office before. As of August 2010, he has released two TV ads, criticizing Obama's stimulus and the deficits.[6] His campaign manager has admitted "Len is an unknown candidate and we are rigorously running on a difficult campaign schedule."[7]

Debates

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
Cook Political Report Solid D[9] October 23, 2010
Rothenberg Safe D[10] October 22, 2010
Swing State Project Safe D
RealClearPolitics Safe D[11] October 23, 2010
Sabato's Crystal Ball Safe D[12] October 21, 2010
CQ Politics Safe D[13] October 23, 2010

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Len Britton (R) Patrick Leahy (D) Other Undecided
Vermont Public Radio/Mason-Dixon October 11–13, 2010 625 ± 4.0% 27% 62% 4% 7%
Rasmussen Reports September 13, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 32% 63% 2% 4%
Rasmussen Reports June 17, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 29% 64% 3% 4%

Fundraising

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Patrick Leahy (D) $3,469,878 $2,090,603 $2,598,061 $0
Len Britton (R) $199,813 $144,541 $55,270 $69,833
Source: Federal Election Commission[14]

Results

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2010 [15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Patrick Leahy (incumbent) 151,281 64.36% -6.27%
Republican Len Britton 72,699 30.93% +6.38%
Independent Daniel Freilich 3,544 1.51% N/A
Marijuana Cris Ericson 2,731 1.16% N/A
Independent Stephen Cain 2,356 1.00% N/A
Socialist Peter Diamondstone 1,433 0.61% N/A
Independent Johenry Nunes 1,021 0.43% N/A
Majority 78,528 33.43%
Total votes 235,065 100%
Democratic hold Swing

References

  1. ^ "Patrick Leahy Defeats Len Britton In Vermont Senate Race". Huffington Post. November 2, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Vermont Results". Politico. August 24, 2010. Retrieved August 24, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "2010 General Election Candidate Listing as of (June 17, 2010 at 7:15 p.m.)".  
  4. ^ "2010 Minor Party Nominations for the November 2, 2010 Vermont General Election".  
  5. ^ Election 2010: Vermont Senate - Rasmussen Reports™
  6. ^ http://www.lenbritton.com/2010/07/26/len-britton-unveils-2nd-humorous-ad-on-national-debt-crisis/
  7. ^ http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/article/20100820/NEWS03/100820022/Senate-candidate-Britton-has-big-campaign-debt#ixzz0yENEvZ5V
  8. ^ http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/article/20101015/NEWS03/101014037/Opponents-challenge-Leahy-in-first-debate
  9. ^ "Senate".  
  10. ^ "Senate Ratings".  
  11. ^ "Battle for the Senate".  
  12. ^ "2010 Senate Ratings".  
  13. ^ "Race Ratings Chart: Senate".  
  14. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for Vermont". fec.gov. Retrieved August 22, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Vermont Election Results". The New York Times. 

External links

  • Elections and Campaign Finance Division at the Vermont Secretary of State
  • U.S. Congress candidates for Vermont at Project Vote Smart
  • Vermont U.S. Senate from OurCampaigns.com
  • Campaign contributions from Open Secrets
  • 2010 Vermont Senate General Election: Len Britton (R) vs Patrick Leahy (D) graph of multiple polls from Pollster.com
  • Election 2010: Vermont Senate from Rasmussen Reports
  • 2010 Vermont Senate Race from Real Clear Politics
  • 2010 Vermont Senate Race from CQ Politics
  • Race profile from The New York Times
Official campaign websites
  • Pat Leahy for U.S. Senate incumbent
  • Len Britton for U.S. Senate
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