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United States Senate election in Vermont, 2012

 

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2012

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2012

November 6, 2012 (2012-11-06)

Turnout 60.4% (voting eligible)[1]
 
Nominee Bernie Sanders John MacGovern
Party Independent Republican
Popular vote 207,848 72,898
Percentage 71.0% 24.9%

County results. Sanders won every county.

Senator before election

Bernie Sanders
Independent

Elected Senator

Bernie Sanders
Independent

The 2012 United States Senate election in Vermont was held on November 6, 2012, alongside a presidential election, other elections to the United States Congress, as well as various state and local elections. Incumbent Independent U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders won re-election to a second term in a landslide, capturing nearly three-quarters of the vote.

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Democratic primary 2
    • Candidates 2.1
  • Republican primary 3
    • Candidates 3.1
      • Declared 3.1.1
      • Declined 3.1.2
    • Results 3.2
  • General election 4
    • Candidates 4.1
    • Polling 4.2
    • Results 4.3
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Background

Then-U.S. representative Bernie Sanders, an independent and self-described democratic socialist was elected with 65% of the vote in the 2006 U.S. senatorial election in Vermont.

Democratic primary

Candidates

  • Bernie Sanders, incumbent U.S. senator[2]

Sanders has also received the endorsement of the Vermont Progressive Party, but declined both the Democratic and Progressive nominations after the primary.[3]

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Declined

Results

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John MacGovern 6,343 75.4
Republican Brooke Paige 2,073 24.6
Total votes 8,416 99.6

General election

Candidates

  • Cris Ericson (U.S. Marijuana), perennial candidate, also running for governor[11]
  • Laurel LaFramboise (VoteKISS)[12]
  • John MacGovern (Republican), former Massachusetts state representative
  • Peter Moss (Peace and Prosperity)[12]
  • Bernie Sanders (I), incumbent U.S. Senator[13]

Polling

Results

United States Senate election in Vermont, 2012
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Independent(a) Bernie Sanders (inc.) 207,848 71.00% +5.59%
Republican John MacGovern 72,898 24.90% -7.46%
Marijuana Cris Ericson 5,924 2.02% +1.36%(b)
Liberty Union Pete Diamondstone 2,511 0.86% +0.55%
Peace and Prosperity Peter Moss 2,452 0.84% +0.26%
VoteKISS Laurel LaFramboise 877 0.30%
No party Write-ins 252 0.09%
Margin of victory 134,950 46.10% +13.06%
Turnout 292,762 63.47%(c) +2.95%
Independent hold Swing

Note: The ±% column reflects the change in total number of votes won by each party or independent candidate from the previous election.

(a) Sen. Sanders identifies as a democratic socialist and caucuses with Senate Democrats.

(b) Cris Ericson previously ran as an independent before joining the Marijuana Party.

(c) Turnout percentage is the portion of registered voters (461,237 as of 11/6/2012)[15] who cast a vote in this election.

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^ http://www.politico.com/2012-election/map/#/Senate/2012/Primary/VT
  11. ^
  12. ^ a b
  13. ^
  14. ^ http://vermont-elections.org/elections1/2012ElectionResults/2012GeneralElectionResults/2012GEStatewideCanvass.pdf
  15. ^ http://www.vermont-elections.org/2012ElectionResults/2012GeneralElectionResults/2012GEVoterTurnout.pdf

External links

  • Elections and Campaign Finance Division at the Vermont Secretary of State
  • Campaign contributions at OpenSecrets.org
  • Outside spending at Sunlight Foundation
  • Candidate issue positions at On the Issues
Official campaign websites
  • Cris Ericson for U.S. Senate
  • John MacGovern for U.S. Senate
  • Brooke Paige for U.S. Senate
  • Bernie Sanders for U.S. Senate
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