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United States presidential election in Colorado, 2012

United States presidential election in Colorado, 2012

November 6, 2012

 
Nominee Barack Obama Mitt Romney
Party Democratic Republican
Home state Illinois Massachusetts
Running mate Joe Biden Paul Ryan
Electoral vote 9 0
Popular vote 1,323,101 1,185,243
Percentage 51.49% 46.13%

County Results
  Obama—70-80%
  Obama—60-70%
  Obama—50-60%
  Obama—<50%
  Romney—50-60%
  Romney—60-70%
  Romney—70-80%
  Romney—80-90%

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Barack Obama
Democratic

The 2012 United States presidential election in Colorado took place on November 6, 2012 as part of the 2012 General Election in which all 50 states plus The District of Columbia participated. Colorado voters chose 9 electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama and his running mate, Vice President Joe Biden, against Republican challenger and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and his running mate, Congressman Paul Ryan. Obama and Biden carried Colorado with 51.5% of the popular vote to Romney's and Ryan's 46.1%, thus winning the state's 9 electoral votes.[1]

As in 2008, the key to Obama's victory was Democratic dominance in the Denver area, sweeping not just the city but also the heavily populated suburban counties around Denver, particularly Adams, Arapahoe, and Jefferson counties, as well as winning Larimer County, home to Fort Collins. Obama also took nearly 70% of the vote in Boulder County, home to Boulder. Romney's most populated county wins were in El Paso County, where Colorado Springs is located, and Weld County.

This election solidified Colorado's transformation from an historically Republican-leaning state into a Democratic-leaning swing state. Obama's 2012 victory in the state, on the heels of his 2008 victory, marked the first time that the Democrats had carried Colorado in two consecutive elections since the landslide re-election of Franklin Roosevelt in 1936.

Contents

  • General election 1
    • Results 1.1
  • Democratic primary 2
  • Republican primary 3
    • Conventions 3.1
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

General election

On the campaign trail, President Obama watches as graduates toss their hats during the United States Air Force Academy commencement ceremony at Falcon Stadium, USAF Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. May 23, 2012.

Candidate Ballot Access:

  • Virgil Goode/Jim Clymer, Constitution
  • Barack Obama/Joseph Biden, Democratic
  • Mitt Romney/Paul Ryan, Republican
  • Gary Johnson/James P. Gray, Libertarian
  • Jill Stein/Cheri Honkala, Green
  • Stewart Alexander/Alex Mendoza, Socialist
  • Rocky Anderson/Luis J. Rodriguez, Justice
  • Roseanne Barr/Cindy Shehan, Peace and Freedom
  • James Harris/Alyson Kennedy, Socialist Workers
  • Tom Hoefling/J.D. Ellis, America's
  • Gloria La Riva/Filberto Ramirez Jr., Socialism and Liberation
  • Merlin Miller/Harry V. Bertram, American Third Position
  • Jill Reed/Tom Cary, Twelve Visions Party
  • Thomas Robert Stevens/Alden Link, Objectivist
  • Shella "Samm" Tittle/Matthew A. Turner, We the People
  • Jerry White/Phyllis Scherrer, Socialist Equality

Results

United States presidential election in Colorado, 2012
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic Barack Obama Joe Biden 1,323,101 51.49% 9
Republican Mitt Romney Paul Ryan 1,185,243 46.13% 0
Libertarian Gary Johnson Jim Gray 35,545 1.38% 0
Green Jill Stein Cheri Honkala 7,508 0.29% 0
Constitution Virgil Goode Jim Clymer 6,234 0.24% 0
Peace & Freedom Roseanne Barr Cindy Sheehan 5,057 0.20% 0
Unaffiliated Jill Ann Reed Tom Cary 2,588 0.10% 0
Justice Rocky Anderson Luis J. Rodriguez 1,262 0.05% 0
Others Others 1,026 0.04% 0
America's Party Thomas Hoefling Jonathan D. Ellis 679 0.03% 0
Socialism and Liberation Gloria La Riva Filberto Ramirez Jr. 317 0.01% 0
Socialist Stewart Alexander Alex Mendoza 308 0.01% 0
American Third Position Merlin Miller Harry Bertram 267 0.01% 0
Socialist Workers James Harris Alyson Kennedy 192 0.01% 0
Socialist Equality Jerry White Phyllis Scherrer 189 0.01% 0
Totals 2,569,516 100.00% 9

Democratic primary

Republican primary

Colorado Republican caucuses, 2012

February 7, 2012 (2012-02-07)

 
Candidate Mitt Romney Rick Santorum
Party Republican Republican
Home state Massachusetts Pennsylvania
Delegate count 14 6
Popular vote 23,012 26,614
Percentage 34.9% 40.3%

 
Candidate Newt Gingrich Ron Paul
Party Republican Republican
Home state Georgia Texas
Delegate count 0 4
Popular vote 8,445 7,759
Percentage 12.8% 11.8%

Results by county. Orange indicates a county won by Romney, purple by Gingrich, green by Santorum, and black indicates a tie between Romney and Santorum.

The Republican caucuses were held on "Republican Party Precinct Caucus Day" (February 7, 2012).[2] Caucus locations opened on 9 PM, February 7, 2012,[3] with 36 delegates at stake; 33 of which are tied to the caucuses while 3 are unpledged RNC delegates.[4] The event occurred alongside the Minnesota Republican caucuses as well the Missouri Republican primary. The race was widely expected to be won by Mitt Romney even on the day of the caucus, but a strong surge by Rick Santorum across all three races that day carried him to a close victory.

Results with 100% (2,917 of 2,917 precincts) reporting:
Colorado Republican caucuses, February 7, 2012[5]
Candidate Votes Percentage Projected delegate count Convention Results [6][7]
MSNBC
[8]
GP
[9]
Rick Santorum 26,614 40.31% 6 6 6
Mitt Romney 23,012 34.85% 13 14 13
Newt Gingrich 8,445 12.79% 0 0 0
Ron Paul 7,759 11.75% 3 0 0
Rick Perry 52 0.08% 0 0 0
Jon Huntsman 46 0.07% 0 0 0
Michele Bachmann 28 0.04% 0 0 0
Others 71 0.11% 0 0 0
Unprojected delegates: 14 0 0
Unpledged delegates: 0 16 17
Totals: 66,027 100.00% 36 36 36
Key: Withdrew
prior to contest

Conventions

There is no formal system of allocating delegates to candidates in any step of the election process. At each meeting the participants decides what the best course of action is.
None of the 36 delegates are legally bound to vote for a candidate.

  • 12–13 April: Seven congressional conventions elects 3 National Convention delegates each and also elects delegates for the state convention.
  • 14 April: State convention elects 12 National Convention delegates.
Convention Results[6][10]
Candidate 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th State Party leaders Total
Uncommitted 2 2 2 2 0 1 1 4 3 17
Mitt Romney 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 8 0 13
Rick Santorum 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 6
Total 21 12 3 36

See also

References

  1. ^ "2012 General Election". Colorado Department of State. Retrieved 22 November 2012. 
  2. ^ http://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/elections/docs/2012ElectionCalendar.pdf
  3. ^ "Colorado GOP moves up 2012 caucuses to Feb. 7". Denver Post. Associated Press. September 24, 2011. Retrieved October 3, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Republican Delegate Allocation". The Green Papers. Retrieved 2011-12-03. 
  5. ^ "2012 Colorado GOP Presidential Caucus Results".  
  6. ^ a b "National Delegate Results". cologop.org. Colorado Republican Party. Retrieved 23 April 2012. 
  7. ^ The Republic,CO GOP Assembly (April 22, 2012)
  8. ^ "Republican Caucuses" (May 7, 2012). MSNBC.
  9. ^ "Republican Caucus"
  10. ^ Bartels, Lynn (14 April 2012). "Colorado Republicans split delegate votes between Romney, unified Paul and Santorum supporters". denverpost.com. Denver Post. Retrieved 23 April 2012. 

External links

  • Official website of the Colorado Republican Party
  • The Green Papers: for Colorado
  • The Green Papers: Major state elections in chronological order
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