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Urap

Urap
Vegetable urap
Alternative names Urab, Urap-urap, krawu
Course Side dish
Place of origin Indonesia
Region or state Java
Creator Javanese cuisine
Serving temperature Mostly served with main course
Main ingredients Steamed vegetable salad, shredded coconut dressing
Cookbook:UrapĀ 
Urap (bottom right) as part of a nasi kuning dish.

Urap (sometimes spelled urab or in its plural form urap-urap) is a salad dish of steamed vegetables mixed with seasoned and spiced grated coconut for dressing.[1] It is commonly found in Indonesian cuisine, more precisely Javanese cuisine. Urap can be consumed on its own as a salad for vegetarian meals[2] or as a side dish. Urap is usually found as a prerequisite side dish of Javanese tumpeng, a cone shaped rice mound surrounded with assorted dishes, as well as part of a nasi kuning dish. In Balinese cuisine it is known as Urab sayur.

Contents

  • Ingredients 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Ingredients

The vegetables which are usually used in urap are spinach, water spinach, young cassava leaf, papaya leaf, Chinese longbeans, bean sprouts and cabbage. To acquire a rich taste, most recipes insist on using freshly shredded old coconut flesh or serundeng, instead of leftover. The shredded coconut is seasoned with ground shallot, garlic, red chilli pepper, tamarind juice, galangal, salt and coconut sugar.

See also

References

  1. ^ Indonesian Food recipes
  2. ^ Vegetarian Guide

External links

  • Urap recipe from Asian food recipe
  • Urap recipe from petit chef
  • Urap recipe from Original Indonesian recipe
  • Resep Urap Urap - Indonesian spicy salad in Youtube
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